make money online no selling.com

Find money online for fast debt

makemoneyonlinenoselling.com is online service which helps you acquire cash money online


Flag
State Utah
Legal status
Allowed (Our partner lenders provide payments in Utah)
Loan amount limit No Limit
Loan terms May not exceed 10 weeks
Finance rates No usury limit
Finance charges No Limit
Maximum APR (Annual percentage rate) No Limit

4085 West 5415 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84118

Utah

Salt Lake City

2630 W 3500 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84119

Utah

Salt Lake City

5416 Amelia Earhart Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84116

Utah

Salt Lake City

753 South Fairway Lane, Orem, UT 84058

Utah

Orem

901 Washington Boulevard, Ogden, UT 84404

Utah

Ogden

576 E University Parkway, Orem, UT 84097

Utah

Orem

550 N Main Street No. 217, Logan, UT 84321

Utah

Logan

70 South 100 West, Kaysville, UT 84037

Utah

Kaysville

8926 S 700 East, Sandy, UT 84070

Utah

Sandy

5366 S 1900 West, Roy, UT 84067

Utah

Roy


Frequently asked questions about pay day loan utah

  • I have a tax question. We now live in Michigan but our January 2008 foreclosure was a property in Utah. We were unable to sell it and had to let it go back to the bank. They told us that it would be auctioned and we would get a 1099 tax form for the short sale amount (their loss). They were unable to auction it off, so we got a tax form for the ENTIRE amount of the mortgage, as if this is income! On top of everything else we have been through, are we gonna have to pay tens of thousands of dollars on this? The property became a HUD home and now belongs to SOMEONE... why should we have to pay tax on the property amount as if the whole thing was our income? This is so screwed up and unfair. Plus, we had mortgage insurance, so how on earth can they say that this is our income?? The mortgage insurance is in place to pay off the bank in case of default! Please, no ignorant comments. We TRIED to save this situation but we were victims of an unfair mortgage like many others, PLUS my husband suddenly became disabled and unable to work while I was very pregnant with our 3rd child in a very dangerous pregnancy. We had to move out of state to save our family and were forbidden by the bank to rent out the property, which was worth $30,000 less at the time than what we paid for it 5 years previously. We had a pile of medical bills the size of a mortgage and had to move in with family for help with this difficult situation. So to anyone wanting to post some snarky remark about paying bills, don't. The last thing we wanted was to end up in a situation like this! If there's anybody out there who can help us with this tax question, we would appreciate the input or advice. We are having our taxes done Monday so I guess we will find out at that time, but we're extremely anxious about the situation and any information will help. Thank you.
  • Thank you, Jss and Stephen for your helpful answers! I will print out the links you gave me to bring to the tax accountant. The cancelled amount was around $75,000. I only earned $23,000 last year (husband $0). Yes, we lived there for 5 straight years and it was our primary residence. I have high hopes that we might come out of this unscathed, or at least just a bit singed. Thank you from the bottom of my heart for the helpful and non-judgmental information.
  • Stephen - I do not know what insolvent means but it sounds pretty serious so... yeah, we probably were/are insolvent. We didn't go through a bankruptcy though, just hell. Travelguruette, we did not refinance. When listing assets and debts... as of when? At the time of the foreclosure we had a WAY negative net worth. Today's story is a bit better. But we're talk ing about last year. I think we have a reasonable assurance here that we will find some mercy at the end of this tunnel. Thank you all so much!
  • The reason it is taxable is that you had use of the money and did not pay it back. The amount that is potentially taxable is the amount due on the loan minus the fair market value. If this is the first mortgage on the house then it is the acquisition loan and by law none of it would be taxable due to the Mortgage Forgiveness Act. If you refinanced the home then the rules change. You are responsible for the money financed minus the cost of the acquisition debt that was paid off when you refinanced. If this is a refi then you need to do a form 982 for insolvency. Get the 1099C and check the date. You need to do a financial statement as of the day before. If the date is 10/5/08 then you need to use 10/4/08. List all your assets and your debts. If your debts are more than your assets then you can exclude that much. For example, if you owe on 100,000 and your debts are 25,000 more than your assets then you only owe on 75,000. Your assets must include any 401k's or IRA's, etc. Your house was foreclosed on way before that date so you cannot use that as debt.
  • 1. If you were insolvent, you may be able to avoid paying the tax. This is a special rule due to the current situation and is not normally the case. The bank does not determine whether you owe tax. The bank is required to send the form to you. You, the accountant, and the IRS determine whether or not you must include the amount on the 1099 in your income for tax purposes. 2. At most, you pay tax on the portion of the debt that the bank had to cancel or forgive in the short sale, in other words, the amount that you borrowed and did not repay. You do NOT pay tax on the entire value of the property. You pay tax only on what you borrowed (received as a loan). Although you did lose the house, it was worth less than what you originally borrowed, so you are still (from an accounting standpoint) making a profit, in that you received and expensive house and gave back a less expensive house (not your fault, but that is how the numbers are calculated).
  • 1. You may have to report sale on Schedule D (Form 1040). 2. Any debt canceled is your income if it was recourse liability. 3. If you lived in the house for two years and owned it for two years in last 5-years, you may be eligible to exclude gain of up to $250,000. Read: http://taxipay.blogspot.com/2008/03/prof... 4. The Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act of 2007 generally allows taxpayers to exclude income from the discharge of debt of recourse loan on their principal residence. Read about foreclosure or repossession http://taxipay.blogspot.com/2008/08/fore...
  • Canceled debts are considered by the IRS to be income and must be reported on your tax return.
  • I have a problem. The house that I'm renting was under default. I found out that the owner was is default after the notice was posted at the door. The property management company swears to God that they weren't aware of the situation. The house was supposed to be sold on the 23rd of Sept. I called the attorneys in charge of the case and they told that the default notice is suspended due to a loan modification. I didn't paid the month of september I was trying to catch up with the house bills. I send an e-mail to ask the situation of the house to the person in charge of the house and she tell's me that I needed to pay rent intermediately or she will evicted me in 3 days! I have children and and dog and it top of everything the furnace is not working so is very freezing...Can someone give me a suggestions as what to do, please!
  • You are behind in the rent, you need to pay. If you don't they have every right to file a 72 notice to vacate, if you DON'T vacate in that time, they have every right to take you to court, sue you for the money they owe, and ask the judge to issue an order to forcefully have you removed from the property, at which time a constable will come to the house, escort you to the street, and your belongings will be moved to the curb. From notice to vacate to being on a curb, depending on the state you live in, could be 1 month, to 3 months.
  • She cant in three days, To actually get you out with an eviction she needs to take you to court. You need to come up with all the rent you owe, You can't just stop paying like that.
  • So I have worked full-time for the past 4 years all while studying full-time as well. I only have a few more prerequisites before I apply to graduate school, and I also have to retake a few classes because of poor grades. After 40 hours of work and 12+ hours in a classroom a week there isn't enough time to do well in school, especially with my family (whom I love dearly, and I am not blaming them for anything, but raising a family does take time, so it's included in my equation of too much on my plate/not enough hours in the day). We receive financial aid (pell grant and stafford loans) which cover all school expenses plus a little bit left over. I need to do really well with my remaining courses to be considered for grad school, and so what I really want to do is drop to part time work so I can focus more time on my schooling. Which in turns means no health care benefits and less $$$. My wife and I are frugal people, we aren't extreme couponers, and we aren't perfect spenders, but we are careful with our money. And we still live paycheck-to-paycheck. So my question is how could I afford to decrease my hours at work? The insurance through the university is crappy. I know there is a program for health insurance through the state (Utah) that could help cover my son. But what about my wife and I? Private insurance is so expensive. Is my only option just to accumulate private loans? Are there programs that aid in costs of living for students with families? (Or does anyone want to donate lots of money to me each semester? I could pay you back... someday. Or does anyone know of a job that pays $20+ and hour and will give me full benefits even if I'm only working part time?)
  • Oh, and it's not really an option for my wife to work more, because that would mean adding cost of babysitters or child care. She makes good money, and is able to work in the evenings when I am home from school and work. Oh and for everyone who is telling me that I made a mistake by getting married and having kids before I am finished with school, I'm not interested in your opinion about that. I am extremely happy, and just because money is tight doesn't mean that I made a horrible mistake. If that is how you want your life then that is just fine, don't judge me for having a family and living my life.
  • First, NO ONE is going to just up and give you money to support yourself and family like this. These are things you should think about BEFORE hand. In any event, what you are asking just doesn't make much businesses sense. You want to work less, but get more? Like the last person said, see if your wife can increase her hours to make up for your short fall. If nothing else, consider holding off grad school until your funds increase.
  • I think there are people out there that would give you a break, not everyone maybe 1 in 500. I am assuming that dropping your hours is temporary so do that until you can go back full time. Many there are some construction jobs that will pay decently in the US (not sure). You could do something that pays well for a short period using one of your skills, fixing electrical items or playing music in bars (you would be surprised how much that pays) if you can do either of these things. Think outside the box to make money, don't sacrifice school to live because it is the schooling which will enable you to make more (if its a quality course). Also I'd like to commend you it is really hard just keeping a part time job and studying but full time with a family, you should be proud to finish school. Edit: What is the person above talking about. There are a lot of people who work short hours but are paid well. Find that job!
  • The salary is not likely to be as high as you're hoping in part-time jobs but maybe your real question is what part-time jobs include health insurance? I've heard that the Costco chain (it's like Price Club) pays more than other stores like it. So does the Trader Joe's chain. I don't know if either of these include insurance. I've heard that even a small part-time job at Starbucks includes insurance. See if any companies in your area are on any "best companies to work for" lists, then it's narrowed down a little. Do a new FAFSA form Jan. 1 after you've used money in the bank to pay off debts. You might qualify for more aid. Or if your circumstances drastically change see if there's a way to increasethe amount of financial aid.
  • can wife get more hours at work? can she get a second job? can she get a better job that offers insurance? employers are already starting to cut back worker hours to 30 per week or less so that they won't have to participate in providing health care... with that, the jobs that will offer benefits to part-time employees are generally jobs that don't pay very well & need the benefits to keep people coming to work If you & your wife need full benefits (and I agree, you need healthcare) then one of you needs to be working full-time for a company that offers excellent benefits -- if you are already in this job & considering leaving this job..... then she will have to pick up the slack & go get a job that will replace what you are loosing EDIT TO ADD: You said wife can't work more hours because that would mean day-care..... have you considered what is more cost-effective --- if she worked more hours.. and you said she makes good money, so paying day-care should be achievable --- if she worked more hours & with that was able to get good health benefits for the family ---- then what is more expensive in the long run ---- paying out of pocket for health care (WAYYYYYY Expensive), paying out of pocket for health insurance (Still Very Expensive), or having her work more hours get benefits and pay for child care It really sounds to me like the problem is you or y'all are unwilling to make adjustments that will be necessary --- you have to weight out cost and benefit --- and this includes your choice to reduce your work hours with a loss of your benefits You & she need to sit down & write out priorities ---- is your income and benefits more important or less important than being in school full-time ---- if being in school full-time is a higher priority.. then how do you replace your income & benefits... if her working more then accomplished that goal... then you have satisfied the higher priority and made adjustments if her working more hours to replace your income & family health benefits is "too costly"... then perhaps school must take a lower priority because the truth then shows that you and/or her not working full-time is the actual higher priority -- if that is the case, then sacrifices must be made to accommodate that priority
  • It's ridiculous having children before you've finished your education. As thus, your problems are of your own making.
  • I assume your wife is working - could she increase her hours to cover the shortfall in yours?
  • He bought a 1996 GMC Sierra one week ago. He put $1000 down. That night, he bought a new battery because the one it it died. Five days later, the fuel pump malfunctioned. He signed some loan papers with a bank that didn't get approved. Now they want him to come in and sign the paperwork for "Buy Here, Pay Here" type financing. Where do we go from here, legally? If it were me, I would probably go down there and blow up in the guys face. Were in Utah.
  • This happens to people with the best of credit. What dealerships do is... They know what you're approved for. They send you home with the vehicle so you can fall in love with it and show all your friends. Then when they call you back, you will pay the extra money because you fell in love w the car and you'll be too embarassed to tell your friends that you didn't get the car. Return the car ASAP! Legally, you have no recourse. As for Lemon Law...That only applies to Brand new cars and it must break down in the first 10000 miles 3 times.
  • It depends on who was selling the truck. If it was an individual, the truck was most likely sold "as is," and your friend is responsible for any maintenance after he purchased the truck. That's why it's important when buying a used car from an individual to look at the vehicle's service record and/or have a mechanic look it over. If the truck was purchased from a dealership, the contract should detail what the dispute/return policies are.
  • lemon laws do not apply to used cars. If he has not paid for the car, he ought to return it. The dealer will probably tell him that he is bound by the contract, and they are right, but he can respond that they are free to sue him but he is not going to pay for the piece of junk. Then walk away without the vehicle. They will holler but they will eventually sell the thing and thus will have no damages.
  • Call your local motor vehicle industry council and they will tell you what to do ....we had the same problem we bought a GMC and the motor died 7 minutes into driving it and we called the Motor Vehicle Industry Council because the dealer was being a jerk about it . The MVIC called the dealer and told him he had to fix it at their expense or they had to give us our money back. The dealer fixed it. Don't sign anything you didn't get approved for the loan...so get your money back and just like I said call the MVIC. GOOD LUCK!!
  • you will no longer be able to persist with lemon regulation to a used motor vehicle. the ideal element to do isn't sign any papers and in basic terms walk removed from the completed element and ask for his refund. as quickly as your buddy signs and indicators the base line, there is no getting out of it.
  • i heard they are very strict about dress and grooming, but fortunately it does not bother me. i just need to get good education, so i think i can tolerate it. anyways, is their law school any good? and should i become a lawyer? what kind of skills are most important in order to become a lawyer? i am not sure about what to do with the rest of my life, but only things that i know is that i want to do something great to the society and make me family proud of me. now i am currently majoring in Business management and minoring in communication, but i do not know what do to with this major after graduation. any idea or advices?
  • If you're unsure that you want to be a lawyer, then I strongly suggest you take a year or two off after college and work. Law school is difficult, expensive, and time consuming, and these days doesn't even give its graduates amazing job prospects. I completely understand the desire to do something great and impress your family, but this is something that you need to do for you because only you are going to have to do the work and only you are going to be responsible for paying back the loan. Most people going to law school take out around $150,000 in debt. BYU is a tier one school and really the best law school you can go to if you want to work in Utah, other than a top-14 school. The school is very well-respected by LDS members, of course. I hear BYU also does fairly well in Idaho, Nevada, and Wyoming since they have so few law schools themselves. Because of its LDS connection, the school has more prestige than it probably deserves in that community. If you're LDS and want to work for someone who is else LDS, this could be a good choice for you. When the economy was booming, BYU only sent 19% of its graduates to the top 250 firms in the US. Now that the economy has slowed, it's much less than that. Don't go to BYU expecting to live outside the mountain west/west and don't go to BYU expecting to make over $100,000/year. The economy is extremely competitive now and, even though BYU is good for Utah, Utah does not have a large legal market and your JD won't be terribly exportable outside the west. To give you an idea, over 53% of BYU graduates stay in the region and 19% go to the Pacific (mostly California, I'm sure). A small percentage scatter across the country, but really this is a regional school, so be prepared to have to live there after graduation.
  • BYU Provo is stronger academically. BYU in Salt Lake City is actually under the thumb of BYU Provo. Were meaning LDS Business College? I'd say in order of bestness, BYU Provo, BYU-H, LDSBC.
Fast percent loan in Alabama Fast percent loan in Alaska Fast percent loan in Arizona Fast percent loan in Arkansas Fast percent loan in California Fast percent loan in Colorado Fast percent loan in Connecticut Fast percent loan in Delaware Fast percent loan in Florida Fast percent loan in Georgia Fast percent loan in Hawaii Fast percent loan in Idaho Fast percent loan in Illinois Fast percent loan in Indiana Fast percent loan in Iowa Fast percent loan in Kansas Fast percent loan in Kentucky Fast percent loan in Louisiana Fast percent loan in Maine Fast percent loan in Maryland Fast percent loan in Massachusetts Fast percent loan in Michigan Fast percent loan in Minnesota Fast percent loan in Mississippi Fast percent loan in Missouri Fast percent loan in Montana Fast percent loan in Nebraska Fast percent loan in Nevada Fast percent loan in New Hampshire Fast percent loan in New Jersey Fast percent loan in New Mexico Fast percent loan in New York Fast percent loan in North Carolina Fast percent loan in North Dakota Fast percent loan in Ohio Fast percent loan in Oklahoma Fast percent loan in Oregon Fast percent loan in Pennsylvania Fast percent loan in Rhode Island Fast percent loan in South Carolina Fast percent loan in South Dakota Fast percent loan in Tennessee Fast percent loan in Texas Fast percent loan in Utah Fast percent loan in Vermont Fast percent loan in Virginia Fast percent loan in Washington Fast percent loan in West Virginia Fast percent loan in Wisconsin Fast percent loan in Wyoming