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State Utah
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4085 West 5415 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84118

Utah

Salt Lake City

2630 W 3500 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84119

Utah

Salt Lake City

5416 Amelia Earhart Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84116

Utah

Salt Lake City

753 South Fairway Lane, Orem, UT 84058

Utah

Orem

901 Washington Boulevard, Ogden, UT 84404

Utah

Ogden

576 E University Parkway, Orem, UT 84097

Utah

Orem

550 N Main Street No. 217, Logan, UT 84321

Utah

Logan

70 South 100 West, Kaysville, UT 84037

Utah

Kaysville

8926 S 700 East, Sandy, UT 84070

Utah

Sandy

5366 S 1900 West, Roy, UT 84067

Utah

Roy


Frequently asked questions about easy loans in utah

  • I was just wondering if anyone could supply me with any resources for helicopter training.... more specifically in regards to financial aid or any kind of "student" loans or scholarships that may be available. I'm 27 years old, and I live in South Florida. I'm desperate to start a career in helicopter piloting but right now it's not financially in the cards for me so I need some help getting started. Also, a buddy of mine at work suggested I try to find a company to sponsor me in my training. Does anyone know of any companies/organizations that do this? For example, they'd pay for training as long as i sign a contract stating that upon successful completion of my pilot training i would work for them for 2 or 3 years afterward.... or something along those lines. Any assistance/references/etc... you can give would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance.
  • First, I too have never heard of any companies that sponsor your initial pilot training. The military would be the only case where your training is paid for, and it is a good option for many people. I disagree with the assertion that getting an airplane license first will save you money. If you want to fly helicopters, then fly helicopters. I feel that you can use airplanes to help fulfill instrument rating and commercial requirements, and save lots of money that way, but not on the private. As you have already discovered, paying for the training is the hardest part. There is no easy way to do it, and while there are some options available for financing, it will still be quite a challenge. Here are some ideas: These two offer loans for training, but they may not be adequate to cover the entire cost, especially in a helicopter: Pilot Finance http://www.pilotfinance.com/pages/539359... AOPA http://www.aopa.org/info/certified/funds... Sallie Mae offers student and career loans. Check if your flight school is set up with them: http://www.salliemae.com/ Also look for aviation college programs like Utah Valley State College. You train at a flight school of your choice while doing UVSC's online classes. You don't need an aviation degree to be a pilot, but you may have better financing options through them: http://www.uvscaviation.com/ Here is a website that will help you find a school, and get started with your helicopter training: http://www.verticalreference.com/vrarticles/helicopter-flight-training.html My final advice is to do your homework and investigate thoroughly all options before beginning. Having a good plan in place before you start will help prevent problems down the road. Good luck!
  • If the military route is not for you, there are a number of flight schools out there that are available; just google a search and I'm sure you could find at least a half dozen of them. Beware however that helicopter training is very expensive; more so than fixed wing training. The best route to go if you are doing this yourself would probably to go and get your fixed wing private pilot's license which will run you between +/- $6K-$8K depending on where you go. That will give you the basics of flight and teach you many of the rules and regs you will use as any kind of pilot. Most fixed wing aircraft rent for about $100-125 an hour plus instructor fees. Rotary generally is about double that amount or more. Most accredited flight schools have tuition assistance available that is generally easy to get especially with a co-signer. Watch out however for scam artists that want all the tuition up front whether you complete training or not. They are definitely out there. Do your homework, and be prepared to work at it; a commercial helicopter rating will run you somewhere in the neighborhood of about $40-50,000. After you get your rating, you will probably have to work as a flight instructor for a while to build up your hours. Most insurance companies won't touch you without at least 1,000 hours and many want a lot of turbine time also if that's what you will be flying (as most commercial heli's are). But the previous answer is right. The military is a great way to go. Either way, he is correct. You will always have a job. There are no commercial companies that I am aware of that will sponsor you but some of the flight schools will employ you afterward as a CFI if you complete their training. Good luck!
  • I don't no about your country but I would say there would be next to nobody out there that would fund helicopter training other than the services. Back in the 70's here you maybe lucky and build some hours working as a skid biter until you had enough to sit your test but now things are different. for a start most insurance companies wont touch you until you have at least 1000hrs for a jet heli like as350. Even with a commercial heli licence it is still very hard to get work and most of the time employers want so many hours on type. I have heard of people doing a secound log book and showing it to captains on fishing boats to try get work flying hughes 500s then logging the hours in there real log book. Once you get to the stage that you have the above you will not be working in cities, you will be out in choppy oceans eating asian food for a 3 month period and have no one to talk to because they all speak a different language, the captain will want to kill you because there are no fish to be found and because you are up there trying to spot them you will be blamed for it. Once you pass that you maybe lucky and get a job lifting logs in Canada in some remote camp. Once you have had enough of all that you maybe lucky and get a job flying tourists around the city, but it is a very long road to get to that point. If you want the glamour become a airline pilot. If you think you can handle it give helis a shot because they are much more of a challenge and a job that most can only dream of. PS never listen to training schools saying there is heaps of work out there for heli pilots. They are right saying that but it is only half the story. There is heaps of work out there for a pilot with experience.
  • Go where I went. The US Army Flight School in Fort Rucker Alabama. Enlist in the Army, do two years, apply for flight training and you will never have to look for a job again.
  • so, I have finish high school and now I'm just working to safe enough money for college, I going to start college soon and I was thinking in doing ether somewhere in the mechanical engineer( in the engineer field-open for suggestions) area or a physical therapist( again- open for suggestions). I speak Portuguese, Spanish and of course English, and now I'm trying to learn Japanese. I'm hoping to live ether in Utah, California or Arizona. please let me know what you think, and your suggestions, please keep it serious, I'm truly looking for the best options for my future, and I need a bit of help. ( open for suggestion for different careers!)
  • Take your SAT or ACT. Engineering will be the better field. But could you hack Mech Engineering? If this degree were easy, everyone would take it. Note: You will not be able to save enough for 4 years of college on your own. Well, it could take you 10 years. Hope you have parents that will chip in, or you will count on student loans.
  • Sometimes the mere principal makes it all worth while. I have sued someone in small claims for back rent in Utah and it was very easy. I paid my fee, set my hearing (the are usually in the evenings so you don't miss work) and the guy didn't show up (they usually don't for these types of things) and so I was granted a Default Judgment (which means I won because the guy didn't contest it). I have a judgment sitting on this guy's credit now that he may never pay, but he will always have it hanging over his head if he tries to get a loan or a credit card. You can also have a hearing after the judgment has been entered for the person to prove assets. I didn't have this guy do that because I know he doesn't have anything.
  • A $3,500 claim would be worth pursuing. The only question you need to answer is whether the defendant has insurance or the money to pay a judgment if you meet with success. I would inquire around to learn if the small claims court in your state is designed to be a true people's court vs. just a layer of bureaucracy on the way to the higher trial court. You just need honest advice before acting on your claim.
  • I have never seen a small claims fee approaching $500. More like $75 in my state. As to collecting, if the person has no money you will not get paid. If he has wages, they can be garnished. If he has insurance that covers the type of claim, the insurance company can pay.
  • Most of the time you don't have a choice. If the claim is small, the other courts will not hear it. Is it worthwhile can be said about all courts. You should consider the debt collection. If you can't do that then it is a worthless event.
  • For me, it only cost $100. In your lawsuit, you can request the court cost be included if you win. If you win, do you think the other person would be able to pay? If not, then it is a waste. How much are you trying to get?
  • It's worth it to me
  • guardianship, but want to help him get on his feet financially. Obviously, he has no rights to sign a lease, get a loan or anything else as a minor. Under Utah law, what is this child entitled to? How can we best help him without assuming legal guardianship? Additional Details He is an amazing kid. He is almost an eagle scout, has a steady job, is active in his church youth group, plays four musical instruments and treats my daughter wonderfully. He has been living with us for four days with his parents knowledge. We simply need to know where to look to get him the additional help he needs. He would like to get his own apartment and stand on his own two feet, but, like I said, he is a minor with no rights
  • He has three options. He can go to Child Services and they can make the father take him back. He can go to Child Services and get placed in foster care as his father is abusive. That would be the easiest as he can still go to school and get an education. He can go to Child Services and request their help in becoming emancipated. That would be the hardest as he will have to show he can support himself. That means he has to have a job.
  • in the journey that your boyfriend and his brother are brainwashed into questioning what their dad is doing is sweet, than they're going to manage their own childrent the very similar way. they have been made to trust they are undesirable and need to be punished. they have under no circumstances customary something diverse. (OH, the position is the mum in all of this??) And their father is thrashing them through his interpretation of being a sturdy Christian? record the project!!!!! call the police, DCFS, tell your father and mom, a college counsellor, your pastor or priest, any close grownup you experience will take action on your behalf in case you won't be able to attempt this your self. Your boyfriend would not celebrate with the intervention at this factor, yet optimistically in time, with counselling and help, will come to celebrate with what you've finished. And optimistically his dad also receives the help he desires to be an helpful and non-abusive be certain. you've made the first step by utilising accomplishing out soliciting for assist in making a range. there are quite some solutions out right here to ascertain and picture about, yet your instincts will inform you what to do. He desires help and can't ask for it himself. Be his recommend.
  • He can emancipate. I grew up with a friend in a similar situation only she was being molested by her step father. Her mother never believed her. She emancipated when she was 16, got a job waitressing, had some help from some of her friends, found an apartment and has been living on her own ever since. She'll tell you its the best decision she ever made. Look into it.
  • In PA we have an agency called Children and Youth that deals with such situations. I am hoping that this father doesn't show up at your home and cause some sort of disturbance, putting you in the middle. Perhaps an attorney should be consulted as well. Wishing you the best in this situation.
  • It seems to me that you may just have to help him out financially and by letting him stay with you until he is not a minor anymore.. then when he is 18 he can get his own apartment.. I know times r tight, but if hes such a wonderful boy then this shouldnt be a problem
  • Consult a lawyer for legal options..
  • Emancipation would be the best bet.
  • Have him file for emancipation.
  • if he's a minor what your doing is illegal. CALL CHILDRENS AID
  • Here's the thing: I'm a sophomore in college and I'm currently attending a school that is costing my family a pretty good amount of money. It's several hours from where my parents live - at first, my parents were reluctant about me coming here because they were concerned about the price, but we ultimately decided to give it a shot. Well, after the first semester at this school, I've had a good time and I like it, but my dad is still giving me the impression that it's going to cost us a lot of money. I asked him if it was more expensive than he originally thought it would be, and he said yes. I have a job, so I help out financially as best as I possibly can, but I don't want to put my family out of their way anymore. I don't want for my parents to pay more for me to go to school than my siblings, so I'm seriously wanting to transfer to Utah State University (because my grandparents live there, and they are offering me a place to stay. It would be a much more affordable option).
  • But, the problem is, my dad isn't wanting to let me transfer. He's thinking that I shouldn't make a sacrifice for my family, but I really WANT to help out. I already have a sister in college and one of my brothers is about to graduate high school this year and he's going to enroll in college this fall, so my parents will soon have three children to put through college. I've already got a student loan and I've applied for scholarships, but it's still looking financially difficult for my family. My dad also has cancer, and he just got denied extra life insurance, and so he's very stressed out about that. I feel terrible for him...The thing is, he doesn't understand that I WANT to do this for our family. I want to help out. My family's needs are greater than my own. How can I convince him of this to where he will let me transfer schools to make things easier on us? Thanks for your thoughts.
  • Thanks for all your answers so far! I really appreciate it. By the way, a few people asked about my family: Nearly my dad's entire side of the family lives in Logan, Utah (where USU is). His parents (my grandparents), and two sets of aunts, uncles, and cousins. So I have a LOT of family members there, compared to where I am going now. The nearest family member is 2 1/2 hours away.
  • I want to first commend you on wanting to do this for your family. I don't know what approach you've tried, but I would try to help him understand that you are part of the family, and in your opinion families make sacrifices for each other. It's one of the things that increase the family bonds and provide unity and strength. Remind him that you all decided to give it a shot, and you have and now it's time to revisit the decision and you feel that it is in the best interest of the family to switch schools. Help him understand that it's not that you feel you are being asked or pressured to make this choice, but that you gladly do it because it would help the family and that an education is an education - it doesn't matter so much WHERE you go, but what you do when you're there. I'm assuming that USU is also closer to your family/parents? If so, explain that while you did enjoy your time at UA, it was very difficult for you to be so far away from family and that a move to USU will mean that you will be closer to family, and will have the bonus opportunity to help aging grandparents. I'm sure your grandparents would love to have you there, and you could not only help them with things around the house, but also develop a stronger bond with them. In short, try to emphasis what you will gain by the move, and what you lost in attending UA, instead of what you will be giving up if you move from UA to USU. And approach the whole finance thing as just an added bonus to what you consider a more important thing.
  • Wow, this is a tough one. Here are the real issues. 1) Your father's pride as breadwinner ... This is going to have to be resolved privately between you and him with a lot of tact. I suggest you propose these facts: A) Children who pay for their own education are better students because they have a personal investment in the outcome; B) He has given you so much that you feel that you would like to give something back; C) if he can't accept help from you, then propose loaning him the financial help (against your share of his future estate) to ease his current financial burden. This may put the assistance on a more businesslike footing that wont hurt his pride. 2) Unless you are attending some particulary prestigious school that will guarantee you a great job upon graduation, a college education is a college education and most employers dont care where you went as much as how well you did and whether you have completed your degree and graduated. Most State Universities have excellent programs, so, if you can transfer without losing more than a couple credits, if any, then do so. One nice thing about being away from home is that you come back with adult recognition from your parents. I would suggest completing the first year where you are and then transferring in the summertime. Use the summer to pick up a couple transferable credits from the local community college near your grandparents. That will shorten your University studies and save a good bit of money while still retaining the prestige of graduating from a good University early. By the way, graduating early impresses most employers. Good luck!
  • Have you explained it to him like you explained it in the question? That this is something you WANT to do? You could try telling him that there are more than financial reasons that you want to transfer. Tell him you want to spend time with your grandparents, or you heard Utah State's Department of XYZ is really great and thats what you want to major in, or there are great opportunities to explore the outdoors in Utah, etc. etc. Of course your father will feel terrible if he thinks you transferred away from a school you like because you felt like you had to help the family, so you should just frame it more positively when you talk to him about it. Bring it up without mentioning the money issue at all and tell him how grateful you'd be if he'd let you make this decision. All else fails, if you're 18 (which I assume you are) you have the legal right to withdraw from one school and enroll in another. If you're that desperate to help, you could just go ahead and do it on your own. He might get upset, but he'll eventually appreciate the money it saves him. Kudos to you for considering people other than yourself and good luck in school!
  • Hey! Good to see you again, missed you around here. I hope school has been good so far. Here's what I told my parents when I came back from USU because I got ready to go on a mission: Dad (Mom) I have prayed about this and this is what I feel I need to do. I know it will be tough, but I want to do this, and I need you to understand that. You could also put together a pros/cons list, money saved if you transfer (you'd get instate tuition I take it if you went to USU?) Just pray about it, and follow your heart - God loves you both and will help. Good luck, if you want anything else - send me an email.... Storm
  • As I realize it, she 's no longer your spouse now. If she's your ex-lady chum why are you nevertheless afflicted via some thing that occurred 10 years in the past. you may enable pass of it and if that would not paintings, next time once you notice her, only tell her in a well mannered way which you won't be able to forgive her for no longer being waiting to witness the delivery of your twins and then enable it pass. Feeling furious, dissatisfied and so on. is hurting you greater then you definately understand. and he or she is punctiliously blind to what she did to you, which you nevertheless carry this ingredient around with you and he or she lives fortunately ever after, on an identical time as you're ruining your wellbeing with hatred. that's totally wasted power. and it's time to pass on.
  • If you feel it is the right choice, go for it. It's only natural for your dad to want to help you regardless of the sacrifices to him and the rest of your family, he's your father and he loves you. But if you pray about it and really feel going to Utah State would be the best choice, you should do it. I wish you luck in the decision! Utah State is a great school, that's where I'm going! :D
  • Sounds like you are helping all you can. The biggest part being your willingness to transfer to save money. Your parents are doing what they feel they should. Sounds like he really doesn't want you too far away? Not sure where you live in relation to your parents now. Tell your dad the offer to transfer is open. Knowing there is another sibling headed to college soon, he may need to reconsider his stand. Let him know that if things become really strapped you will still be willing to transfer. You sound like a good kid........I know your parents appreciate your concern. Let them do what they can for you. They want to do that much.
  • Help your dad to understand that this is something that you want to do. If you are a spiritual person (I'm assuming yes) help him to understand that you have prayed about it and feel that this is a decision you need to make for your own life as well as for the family. As his health is not great, I'm sure that it would be a comfort to you and to your family to be closer together right now. Your Father only wants the best for you, and so all you have to do is help him to see that you are trying to make the best decisions fr yourself.
  • Pray about it & you will know what to do
  • Any welding shop that has a TIG welder should be able to do it. Snap on tools carries a set of (i'll call them "easy outs') made by the same company thats make all the pipe threading stuff (i can't hink of the name.) any way the kit is really nice, It contains Guides to put over the stud (to align it correctly) and drill bits, drill bit stops and what I call thrusters..You drill the hole in the stud.drive a thruster down into the hole and then use a wrench to un screw it.. http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item.asp?... Is there any stud left above the hole if so Sears has a set of extractors that have a reverse turn. you place it over the stud and just turn it out with a wrench..the more you turm the harder the extractor bite'd in to the stud. http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/search.do... I have both sets if you were in Utah i'd loan you which ever it took. I do alot of old car restoring and these two thing are really handy. If you have the money invest in both....
  • Look up Texas Exhaust in Bridgeport (about 35 minutes NW of Ft. Worth on 287/114). My friend owns the place, and he can do just about anything when it comes to welding.
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