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State Texas
Legal status
Allowed (Our partner lenders provide payments in Texas)
Loan amount limit Loan Terms:
Loan terms  Not specified
Finance rates  Up to 180 days for CAB agreement
Finance charges  No cap on Credit Access Business fees.  Lender interest capped at 10%.
Maximum APR (Annual percentage rate)  No cap.  Regulator reports average cost 410%.

1835 South Main Street, Weatherford, TX 76086

Texas

Weatherford

1220 N Town East Boulevard, Mesquite, TX 75150

Texas

Mesquite

13909 Nacogdoches Road, San Antonio, TX 78217

Texas

San Antonio

104 Austin Avenue, Weatherford, TX 76086

Texas

Weatherford

621 East Nolana Avenue, McAllen, TX 78504

Texas

Allen

3200 Andrews Highway, Midland, TX 79701

Texas

Midland

1250 Northwest Highway, Mesquite, TX 75149

Texas

Mesquite

5502 N Fry Road, Katy, TX 77449

Texas

Katy

1806 E End Boulevard N No. 1300, Marshall, TX 75670

Texas

Marshall

1304 W Davis Street No. Centre, Conroe, TX 77304

Texas

Conroe


Frequently asked questions about hard loan money texas

  • ABSOLUTELY~~ When you sign a promissory note, it's your obligation to repay the money you clearly used to benefit yourself an education.........................when you do not repay, it' causes interest rates to increase and makes it harder for other students coming behind you the benefit of financing their educations..... Remember the FEDERAL GOVERNMENT backs student loans and can not only garnish your wages, they can confiscate your future earnings, liquidable assets and tax refunds...........you really don't wanna get in bad with them. I would suggest you contact your lending institution and set up some sort of repayment schedule or deferment................would you want someone to borrow something from you and NOT repay it? I doubt it!
  • Texas Guaranteed Student Loan
  • 1
  • Texas is a non wage garnishment state for debts like credit card debts, but this does not apply to student loans. Regardless of what state you live in, if you have a Sallie Mae/Dept. of Education backed student loan that goes into default, they can garnish your wages at up to 15%. They have direct power to do this and they don't need to take you to court. All they have to do is provide a 30 day written notice that your wages will be garnished.
  • This Site Might Help You. RE: Can texas guaranteed student loan corporation garnish my wages? or is it just a collections company trying to collect a debt? i would appreciate any advice.
  • Unfortunately, they most definitely can. http://www.tgslc.org/borrowers/repay/why... From their site: Delinquencies can cost you extra money and can affect your credit history for years. * Your lender can charge you a late fee under the terms of your loan. * Your credit score is based on your repayment history. A low credit score could make your future consumer loans, such as a mortgage or auto loan, more expensive. * You could lose your ability to borrow money in the future. Under certain circumstances, federal and state laws *require* guarantors like TG to: * Withhold *a percentage of your wages* until your account is paid in full. * Report your default to all national credit-reporting agencies. * Add collection charges, attorney fees, and court costs to the balance of your loan(s). * Place a hold on the renewal of your State of Texas Practitioner's License. * Seize your *federal tax refund* and other state or federal payments. * Prevent you from receiving additional student aid and other federal benefits.
  • Tg Loans
  • if you defaulted on a gsl loan to them, they can. they can garnish your wages, put a lien on your assets, reroute your tax refunds. in my view, garnishment is the worst because it alerts your employer of your default status. in any economy, you do not want your employer seeing you in such a negative light.
  • Yes, and they will. And they don't give a **** if it ruins your life.
  • Tell your friend to RUN FAST and FAR These are loan sharks operating in a non regulated politically insecure state. They do most anything and Texas will allow it. You will no doubt lose the property at the 5 year mark when the balloon is due. This is the same type of financing model that helped with the national housing crisis, of 2007.
  • Hard money loans are risky, but used in the right way, can facilitate a project to get started. Banks don't like to lend on properties with problems. If the problems can't be cured (soil instability for example) then don't bother. But if the problems can be cured (burned-out buildings, broken plumbing, cracked foundations, etc.) then once you fix the problem, the banks will be glad to consider lending. Hard Money can fund the repairs, and then the owner can refinance through standard means -- with a good result. However, hard money is expensive (11-15% APR) and has high fees (4-8 points or more). Plus, the loan-to-value is quite low (50-65%). You really have to do the numbers in order to determine if this is a good plan or not. For example, if you have a property you can buy for $40k, fix for $50k, and sell for $200k, then maybe it makes sense. But if the after-repair-value (ARV) is $110k, then no -- walk away. As to whether an individual with poor credit should use hard money -- the added question beyond the above is this: Is that particular propery so important, that he should risk everything for it? Sometimes the answer is yes -- it's my family's homestead from 1892, for example. So then you may want to do it. However, if it's just to buy a house because you're sick and tired of renting, no -- focus on getting your credit fixed first, keep paying your rent on time, and work with a trusted mortgage advisor to reach the qualification required to get a loan. There are indeed loans out there for people doing a good job of repairing their credit.
  • there is quite a few on google - just enter loans /hard money / lenders .
  • We are currently leasing a home and would like to buy the home. We have exchanged emails with the homeowner and he is very willing to work something out. We are talking about owner finance. In our last email, he said something like Texas made it a lot harder for landlords to get into these things as they used to take advantages of Tenants with poor credit. Please search around and let me know if you find any good option we can work it out. We have researched contract for deed option and various others and cannot find anything suitable. Our credit would be defined as fair at this point. He is very willing to work with us, just wants everything to be fair. Does anyone have any suggestions? We would really like this place and are interested in owner finance, lease to buy, whatever. Any information would be greatly appreciated. THanks.
  • the state of Texas has not made those sorts of things illegal but they have made them very hard to work out. Among other things it appears that the "buyer" may be able to cancel the deal at the end of thirty days and get every bit of money returned- no questions asked- including any money paid for a house payment or rent. Your owner could make an actual mortgage out to you but then it would make it hard and expensive for them to get their house back if you don't make payments. SO the owner just wants you to go out and get a mortgage from a company. Have you actually talked to a good local loan officer? They may be able to help you make this work. Things have changed but there is still a lot of money out there. A first time home buyer can actually get a huge tax credit from the federal government even more than you have paid into the system! FHA is pretty low down payment and there are a few local bond programs and such.
  • Texas is a group estate state. You can input into any acquire contract X, as a married man or woman, as her separate estate, however your quickly to be ex will need to signal a stop declare deed on the final desk to acquire name coverage. Sorry, however there's no means round that. Try for a hire choice till your divorce is last.
  • Hollie 99% of owner finances fail because buyer can never get a real loan. The buyers always lose. Be patient until credit improves and buy it the old fashion way.
  • Absolutely, positively do not do a contract for deed. They benefit the seller only. I strongly suggest you ask a real estate attorney to draw up the proper documents for you . Your credit doesn't matter to anyone unless it matters to the seller if he's going to be the one financing the property.
  • yes hire a real estate lawyer to draw up the paperwork and ensure both parties are protected.
  • I am currently an LVN in Texas. I got a student loan through The College Network to continue my education and get my RN. I never completed the program, in fact i never started. I tried to return the study guides etc to the College network, but they gave me the run around. That was 2 years ago. Now Oak Rock Financial, the company my loan is through, has sent my loan to some law office. The lawyer guy called me and told me that if i don't agree to settle ($5500 for something i never even used) then "the law says you can lose your nursing license for defaulted student loans". I cant afford to pay thousands of dollars for something i didnt use/do. Of course the lawyer was extremely aggressive and told me his client was Oak Rock, and had nothing to do with the College Network so he didnt really care. I got a loan, and i have to pay it -etc etc. He told me to get a loan at the bank, to pay back Oak Rock. Problem is is that i probably wouldnt qualify for a loan in the first place. I dont know what to do. I was under the impression that would happen ONLY if i defaulted on a loan used to obtain my license. Which this is not. Does anyone know?
  • I'm not trying to get out of paying it back really, i'll pay it if i can. What i'm mainly concerned with is losing my license. Regardless of the outcome, i have NO money to pay at this time. If i lose my license, i cant work - and therefore it'll be harder to pay back. I just want to know if the law states whether its ANY student loan, or just the loan used to obtain your license, that cant be defaulted.
  • What do you mean, you didn't use it? If you took the money - it doesn't matter if you bought hotdogs or went to school - you have to pay it back.
  • Lawyers can say alot of things when you can't prove it. Although you know you have to pay the loan back, you can't lose your current license, which had nothing to do with the current loan for an RN. That would be like taking away a doctor's license to practice medicine if he dropped out of law school. Does that make sense? NO! I suggest before you give in to anything this lawyer says, you obtain your own lawyer. And beware of this lawyer harassing you. As you never obtained the RN license, they cannot suspend your license. In most college cases, you would be unable to graduate without a payment plan set up. You are well past that stage. And that lawyer sounds like an ***. Don't take any of his crap and set up a minimal payment plan Right now everyone is hurtin' for money and no amount is too small. Good Luck and don't stress.
  • The problem is that the college received the money for your education. The fact that you dropped out doesn't change the fact that the money was paid on your behalf. I think you should see if they will work out a settlement with you. My cousin went through a similar situation involving a college grant, but she knew going in that she would have to pay back the money if she didn't finish the program. She contacted the lender before she actually dropped the program. That stopped them from releasing any more money to the school, and she only had to pay back the portion that had already been released.
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