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State Tennessee
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Allowed (Our partner lenders provide payments in Tennessee)

1307 N Main Street, Shelbyville, TN 37160

Tennessee

Shelbyville

909 NW Broad Street No. A, Murfreesboro, TN 37129

Tennessee

Murfreesboro

4298 Summer Avenue, Memphis, TN 38122

Tennessee

Memphis

1218 W Main Street, Lebanon, TN 37087

Tennessee

Lebanon

2111 N Jackson Street No. 111, Tullahoma, TN 37388

Tennessee

Tullahoma

2804 Wilma Rudolph Boulevard No. 2, Clarksville, TN 37040

Tennessee

Clarksville

115 SE Broad Street, Murfreesboro, TN 37130

Tennessee

Murfreesboro

6406 E Brainerd Road, Chattanooga, TN 37421

Tennessee

Chattanooga

1938 Saint John Avenue, Dyersburg, TN 38024

Tennessee

Dyersburg

402 N Cedar Bluff Road No. 4, Knoxville, TN 37923

Tennessee

Knoxville


Frequently asked questions about easy loans in tennessee

  • Okay so i really want to go on the route of owning a lucrative equestrian facility. I would like one which has a very nice facility, hosts shows, and also has clinics from professionals. The major problem is that I am quite short on money seeing as how I am 16 and I do not have the benefit of coming from a wealthy family. I was considering attending Centenary College and doing a working student program for grand prix riders. Although this would aid me in the connections aspect of the horse world it would not aid in the aspect of monetary aid. Any ideas? ( I know i am young, but I have wanted this for a very long time and I am more than willing to dedicate everything within myself to achieve my aspirations. I have considered loans- obviously you need to show some form of high income to pay for this though, other careers- a medical career just so i could afford the barn( this just takes so many years and i would consider them wasted and i do not want to treat people if my entirety is not into helping them), and i have considered looking into properties in the upper new york regions due to low costs- problem: not many people live there and the demographics show the population is not really increasing either. So please if anyone has any ideas at all that could help me to fulfill my dream PLEASE write an answer/comment. Thank you so much to anyone who does.
  • the "fastest" way to do this is to be someone else's barn manager. so, find a barn that is what you like....and find out about working your way into the manager's position. truthfully...the words "lucrative" and "equestrian" don't go together. you're not going to make money owning a barn. speak with any adult who has a barn and you'll get the ugly truth....either you break even every month or you make some profit which really goes right back into the barn. It's not lucrative. If it was, there'd be a lot more people wanting to run their own barn and doing it....but there isn't. There's more people wanting to get out of it than there are trying to get in....that says a lot about the situation. If you are really interested in buying your own barn....you should look into one that's already built....everything's already set up....and look in cheap areas like Texas, Kansas, Nebraska, Tennessee, etc.... But before that....to get real money to buy one...it's going to take years to be able to afford it, to prove you can make payments, etc... that's why barn owners are usually in their late 50s....you don't see a 20-something year old barn owner, unless they've inherited the barn from a dead relative or something. I like your enthusiasm....but I think you being 16 and not currently educated in how the real world is running....you're still just in "dream" stage and not in reality stage, so it's easy to say that this is what you want and it's going to work out....but you need a dose of reality if you're going to make it work. Go to some "high" end barns and talk to the barn owners/managers.....get to know how it all works for real....and see if you can make your way up from someone's assistant to the manager....to at least get a real idea as to what it takes to make it all come true and work.
  • I'm with Wasabi, become a barn manager for someone else first. I'm hoping to run a small scale boarding barn when I get older as a side thing and in college I want to manage a barn to help with tuition and maybe get some on-site housing not far from school. I wouldn't entirely depend on a barn to keep you a float financially. The age old statement 'To make a small fortune, start with a large one.' However, I understand wanting to do this. I'd go to college and major in something that you'd like as a back up as you said. I want to major in psychology and go on to become a psychiatrist to get the money for it. Then make your minor in Equine Studies (Then if your career in your major pays well enough, go back and major in Equine Studies for 2 or 4 years.) While in college if the college has a riding team, get on it. Work at stables. Try to get mounts to show and get your name out there. Work in your 'backup career' for a couple years to get some money and start investing in land and barns. Then start small-scale boarding and local shows to have more income and put that into the 'farm fund' and just keep building up your farm until it's where you want it to be. When your farm provides steady income, drop your other job and work full-time on the farm. If all fails, you still have the degree and resume to go back. Good luck!
  • A human medical profession won't pay for a stable. Consider a career in animal health or husbandry. Plenty of schools offer degrees with a focus on horses. Meanwhile, try and find a good stable you can work out, even as a volunteer. If you are very focused and diligent, you can work with people who do have money and horses and help out/participate in shows.
  • I'm getting ready to go to college at Belmont University in Nasville Tennessee. By the end of my college, I will have had to take out at least $75,000.00 in student loans. Is it worth it to owe this amount of money if my major will only get me a career that makes $45,000.00 a year? I'm going to college so I can have a career I love, not to make a lot of money. How long do you suspect it would take to pay this amount off on average. Thanks.
  • Whoa, 75K in loans? That's a whole lot of money. The general rule for loan borrowing is to only take out what you can make in a year. So if you're expecting to make 45K, but you owe 75K, that's not a good idea. Why don't you go to community college for your first two years? It's sooo much cheaper. I went to CC in Virginia, my Pell grant covered the whole thing (and it's only 4731 a year). So let's say we divide 75K by four, which gives you a total of 18750 a year. At Nashville Community College, it's a little more than 100$/credit so 18 credits (the max you can take in most schools with exceptions) would be 1800/semester before books and fees. So you'd spend 3600 a year, and 7200 for two years, as opposed to 37500 for two yearsat belmont. You'd save more than 30K! And if you do really good in CC, it's easier to transfer into most four years than as a freshman. I went to CC for two years and transferred to George Washington, where it's 54K a year. If I had gone for all four years, I would have spent an extra 100K!. Do what you love, that's the only thing that will make you happy. But you don't have to be 75K in debt to do it. Good luck
  • i agree ^ definitely go to a cheaper college first :)
  • I want to go to Tennessee State University for the 4year nursing program so that I can get into obstetrics. I am a 22year old single mother of 2. I really want to go to school but I have NO money. Is there anything I can do or any program I can get in to? Any info on nursing school is greatly appreciated also. Thanks...
  • You take out a loan like everyone else. Re: military route - it's not as easy as that. You may not gain enough experience (to pass the test) - so it depends on where you're trained. Don't count on it is what I am saying.
  • State of California law allows military corpsmen to take the national exam for RN license without the need for any further formal education if they have completed RN level education and clinical experience while serving as a part of the armed forces. And try scholarship too.
  • Scholarships and military. (best branch for healthcare or so I hear is the navy.) http://www.navy.com/navy/careers/healthcare/nurse.html All the best of luck!
  • I am a junior at a high school in West Tennessee. I am currently the top student in my class and I am active in several activities outside of school. My dream is to go to the Academy of Art University in San Francisco and major in Motion Picture and Television. The annual budget for an undergraduate student is around $31,000. My parents make a little over $100,00 annually, but they have told me that they cannot afford to pay for much of my college. In between scholarships, grants, work-study and small student loans, would it be entirely unrealistic of me to raise enough money each year. I am incredibly uncertain about the scholarship scene, how easy it is to win money, and whether or not it could cover a fraction of the costs. My dream is to attend this school, and I would be willing to do whatever it took to accomplish my goal. I've gained an impressive collection of bookmarks to scholarship searching websites, but I'm looking for a real-world answer. Thanks!
  • You will have the most luck at scholarships going directly to this school and asking them. Because of your parents high income, I doubt you would qualify for grants or work study at any school. I also worry that most outside sources of scholarships will not be impressed with your school choice the "Academy of Art" does not exactly scream Academia. Sorry - just real world answer and option for all it's worth. Have at least 5 schools with varying degrees of cost if you can't come up with scholarships that will go anywhere and not just the school that issues them. Make sure you list state schools as well if your folks aren't going to help you. Also a word of warning about an expensive school like this, even if you do manage to scrape together 30,000 for your first year, you will have to continue doing it for the next 3 years. Kids are sometimes so pleased they accomplished this the first year they forget they are going to have to keep doing it and drop out after a year or two for lack of funds... then they are a drop out with a debt of 60K and nothing to show for it but loan payments they can't afford.
  • My parents make $90, 000 a year - making it impossible to get anything from FAFSA - and have given me NOT ONE CENT. I made it into Duquesne which is 32k a year on my own. Let your parents know they will have to sacrifice a lifestyle for your education, but it is the best investment they could make. With your grades and especially your involvement any normal school would give you at least $10000 in scholarships and grants. Have your parents pay as much as they can and take out loans. do NOT settle for a lesser education. Take it from me, I'm a transfer student because of i went to a school that didn't challenge me, but gave me lots of $
  • You will need to take out student loans.
  • L O A N S & pell grants & a job
  • 5 years ago when i was married I purchased a car in my name (loan), my then husband and i were having issues, he abandoned me and our 3 children a month later. It took a year to find him to get divorce finalized. (Back-up)..when he left he took the new car with him...4 counties away...& 6 weeks later, found him an the car, had police escort, got it back, I had by then obtained another car loan and new car with payments. The first car i could not now afford, I returned it to the dealership with the keys, told them what happened, i cant afford it, "here's the keys". Not the best way to have done it I know. Anyway this happened nearly exactly 5 Years ago. Recently I received a letter from a collection agency asking for deficiency payoff from me. )I assume they found my name on a magazine catalog list somewhere). They are asking outrages methods of paying this off. I'm not opposed to settling with them, but, is it possible this debt is no longer valid? Or don't they have to have re-sold this car using proper methods? I'm just looking for my rights and any loopholes these sharks may have screwed up on to make this easier on me. I'm still single with 3 children. Any info is helpful...I live in tennessee
  • Sorry, but the fact that you are single and have 3 children have nothing to do with your obligation to pay the loan back for the car you purchased. I am perplexed why this did not concern you when you dropped off the keys to the car 5 years ago? How can you blame someone else because you made the decision to do this? You defaulted on the terms of the contract you signed when you bought the car and now you must re-pay the debt. They likely re-sold the car at at auction at some point and that amount must be deducted from your loan amount. Note that sales of auction vehicles typically go for about 30-70% of the actual car's value. You are still responsible for the value of the loan plus storage, repo fees and admin costs minus the cost that the car sold for. Sorry, but hiding out so a collection agency cannot find you to repay a loan is not going to be a loophole you can use to get out of an obligation. Using an analogy that is close to you, the courts are not going to forgive the obligation of your husband owing you child support just because he disappears for 5 years. Ineedmore - I never said I had anything easy. I tell it like it is, you tool. If you were raised think we live in a world where there are no winners and losers and you can just walk away from any obligations without consequences, then you are a fool. If you don't want to real-life answers then go talk to a psychiatrist that will tell you what you want to hear. If you read the question, the person who asked the question admitted it was their debt. It doesn't magically go away. period. Do I feel sorry for the lady asking the question because of her situation? YES! Does me feeling sorry for her have any impact on reality or change any of her obligations to repay the loan? NO!
  • Legally, you are on the hook for 7 years, Realistically, since its been 5, I would probably just ignore them. Theres a chance they could sue you but if they were going to do that, they would have done it already. Chances are your loan was bundled with a bunch of other uncollectable ones and sold for pennies on the dollar or less. A cease communications letter will get the collection agency to stop calling. You were very lucky they didn't sue you & garnish your wages years ago. They easily could have. At this late of a date, Id just ignore it. I got bills from a place that billed me from an ID theft over 10 years ago. I just threw it in the trash. Its not on my credit report and they cant do anything to me.
  • in the event that they nonetheless have the vehicle, then it is not a defecient stability; it would not make experience that they might have the vehicle 2 years later. confident, you will possibly definitely ought to establish your settlement is in writing, and which you carry onto the letter as your lender ought to very particularly turn around and sell the account (no count if intentionally or no longer) and reason a extensive headache and pastime nightmare down the line. I trust stan for you to touch a supervisor with reference to the posession of the automobile.
  • For "stupid flanders'...its obvious your named from reputation...twit !! Not everyone has life as easy as you......The answers your looking for will not all be found here. If it is your debt, offer then 1/2 the amount, it shows your trying, if it goes to court it will likely be settled for about half anyway. Also write them a letter asking for documentation(proof) that this debt is valid and that its yours. Many debts have been erased because the debtor could not find sufficient proof that the debt was valid & legal to that person.
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