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State Tennessee
Legal status
Allowed (Our partner lenders provide payments in Tennessee)

1307 N Main Street, Shelbyville, TN 37160

Tennessee

Shelbyville

909 NW Broad Street No. A, Murfreesboro, TN 37129

Tennessee

Murfreesboro

4298 Summer Avenue, Memphis, TN 38122

Tennessee

Memphis

1218 W Main Street, Lebanon, TN 37087

Tennessee

Lebanon

2111 N Jackson Street No. 111, Tullahoma, TN 37388

Tennessee

Tullahoma

2804 Wilma Rudolph Boulevard No. 2, Clarksville, TN 37040

Tennessee

Clarksville

115 SE Broad Street, Murfreesboro, TN 37130

Tennessee

Murfreesboro

6406 E Brainerd Road, Chattanooga, TN 37421

Tennessee

Chattanooga

1938 Saint John Avenue, Dyersburg, TN 38024

Tennessee

Dyersburg

402 N Cedar Bluff Road No. 4, Knoxville, TN 37923

Tennessee

Knoxville


Frequently asked questions about bad credit loans in tennessee

  • Over that 40 year, I will have paid over $400,000 in interest money. I was not aware of all the hidden fears and interest. Can I refinance and if so, How much can I save? Can something be done now about these banks praying on ordinary people, any new laws out? What can I do? I live in Tennessee. Thank you very much!
  • Hi, I used "Quicken Loans" to refinance my home.The rate is very low even though my credit score is very bad.Check it out here: http://QuickenLoans2010.notlong.com
  • You're not giving much information. First, what is the term of your mortgage? That is, when do you have to renew it? 40 years sounds more like the amortisation period. The amortization period is set to allow the minimum repayment schedule to be calculated. It could be set to 40 years (more interest, longer to pay off, but 480 smaller payment at a time), or much lower like 15 years (less interest, shorter time to pay off, but 180 higher payment at each payment period). Which you choose depends on your income and current indebtedness. They're seldom hidden - all you need to do is ask for the schedule, and it should include the amount you owe at any time, as well as the interest that's taken out of each payment. It's NOT preying on ordinary people - the bank has to give out the money that's used to buy the house in the first place. Not that banks are good samaritans - they do make a lot out of people, but if you lent money to someone, wouldn't you expect to be paid back with interest? Can you refinance? Of course - you have the choice. That's why the term the mortgage runs is important - it's usually somewhere between one and five years (one takes the shorter if one thinks that interest rates are going to fall; the longer if you expect the interest rates to go up). However, there MAY be a penalty fee if you don't go the whole term. How much can you save? That depends on the new rate, the penalty fee and the amortization period (as explained above). Usually, over five years, the interest rate has to drop one point (like from 6% to 5%) to make much of a difference in your payments after the penalty fee. But, if you drop the number of years down to around 15, the total interest you pay could be as little as 1/3 of what it would be over forty years. What can you do? Read the contract that you signed. Look at what you are actually getting and look at the schedule before you actually sign. Work out what the best deal is for you, out of all the options you can get. If you have to, get someone to explain all the terms before signing. You might still sign, but at least you will know the information that the banks have actually given you.
  • I'm always amazed at people who are shocked when they realize how much interest they are going to wind up paying on a loan. This isn't some sort of hidden secret. Another poster did a good job of explaining the various mortgage options. However, the one thing not mentioned was the possibility of doing extra payments. Any additional money you pay lowers the amount of principal that the next amount of interest is calculated on, so you will wind up spending less on interest and own your house sooner. The calculator below will show you how much you can save by adding different amounts of money to your monthly payment.
  • You can talk to any local bank, credit union, or mortgage company and ask them about refinancing. It will depend on your income, credit rating, and the current value of the property. Without knowing how much you borrowed and at what interest rate, we can't say whether your current mortgage is a very good one, a very bad one, or something in between.
  • My sister-in-law was in a simular situation and got her mortgage reduced to almost half.. and her credit sucks.. she use a private company to get her better deal..hope they help you.....http://www.homeloanprotection.tk
  • I went to the dealership, signed the contracts, and drove off with a brand new Sentra that I thought would be the love of my life -- only to find out a few days later that I was dealing with a sketchy finance/general manager. I signed with conditional delivery agreement (some people refer to this as spot delivery, I think -- bad idea now, I know). Long story short, after arguing with the dealership about the warranty and a few other complaints, I told the bank when they called that I wasn't keeping the car, and that I was returning the car to the lot. After having the car just over 24 hours, I dropped the car off and handed the keys to the manager. Because the bank had only pre-approved me, when they heard that I had returned the vehicle upon conditions of the dealership's misrepresentation, they backed out of funding the loan, declining the transaction. The dealers was extremely condescending and beyond vulgar with me -- which to an extent I can understand that it's his profession, but if a deal falls through. it shouldn't keep dragging on. After the original bank declined my loan, all of the others fell through and were uninterested in funding, and on the paperwork it said "If the dealer cannot find funding within 10 days the contract will be void and I may be asked to return the vehicle, or risk repossession." The dealer then proceeded to repost the car for sale, I have a screenshot of the date and time it was re-listed on their site, and was sold within a couple days. I then contacted them in regards to my down payment. I put $2,500 down on it and after re-reading the now voided contract, and all other documents I signed that day, there is not a single mention of the down-payment, and what should happen to it if the funding falls through. Please keep in mind that I'm a politics major, and have ex-police colleagues that also read these documents and said that I should be receiving the payment back. The dealership responded to me with an email stating that they would "get back to me about the refunding of my down-payment once [they] get a response from their legal council regarding the forfeiture of the contract." It has now been an additional two weeks since they sent that reply, and I feel as if they are procrastinating with a purpose. Am I entitled to the return of my down-payment? What steps should I take? I wanted to do it simple and just speak with an attorney on the matter, but with my full-time work schedule I haven't been able to schedule a consultation. I appreciate any support and responses, please do not respond negatively to this, as I am genuinely seeking supportive answers. Thank you very much. Side-note: I didn't have my checks on me, therefore it couldn't be as simple as putting a "stop pay" on.. I paid with my debit card, and ran it as credit.
  • Auto finance is what I do for a living and all I can add to Flanders comments is recheck the purchase order. Some state that down payments are actually partial payments and are not subject to refund. This wording can be found about half way down on the right side of the P.O. under down payment. Good luck.
  • If the dealership can prove that they found a lender willing to lend you money based on the terms of the agreement you signed, then they lived up to their end of the agreement and you are in breach of contract. The dealership may try to argue that your 'unreasonable' actions directly caused the financing to fall through, meaning they are entitled to keep the deposit. Whether that is true or not is for a judge to decide in small claims court.
  • I think they do not intend to make the refund. You should contact your BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU and ask them to intercede for you. Good luck!
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