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State Pennsylvania
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101 Carlisle Street, Hanover, PA 17331

Pennsylvania

Hanover

58 Levittown Shopping Centre, Levittown, PA 19054

Pennsylvania

Levittown

6581 Roosevelt Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19149

Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

805 N 4th Street, Allentown, PA 18102

Pennsylvania

Allentown

Route 413 andamp New Falls Road, Levittown, PA 19057

Pennsylvania

Levittown

1228 Lincoln Way E No. B, Chambersburg, PA 17202

Pennsylvania

Chambersburg

209 N 6th Street, Allentown, PA 18102

Pennsylvania

Allentown

1555 East Wadsworth Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19150

Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

4127 Brownsville Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15227

Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh

8 N 52nd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19139

Pennsylvania

Philadelphia


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  • The US is a large economy, it takes between 18 to 24 months for policy changes to filter down from Pennsylvania avenue to Main Street. In two months things will be much as they have been. Those with fixed rate loans will continue to pay the same as they have, rates will go on on revolving credit and new loans originated. The worrisome thing will be how Bernake responds to the drop (actually correction) in the stock markets. If he introduces QE-3 (i.e. prints up a bunch of money to throw into the markets) then in about 18 months inflationary pressures will manifest.
  • Because of QE1 and QE2 groceries have already inflated enough. You can't eat cheaply any longer. Benanke said there's a possibility of a QE3 but that it would only help the markets as the first two did and cause even more inflation on commodities (food, energy...).
  • We're going to have a good indication in about 7 hours.
  • I hope not too much. I only spend money on essentials, so if that all goes to waste, I'm going to be upset.
  • I decided that I wanted to become a corporate lawyer, but I am not sure what to major in once I start to look at different colleges. I would prefer to attend college in New York, if that is possible; or somewhere close to my home I live in Pennsylvania. I am in the 11th grade at this point, my good are pretty good (92,95,90,89, and 83). I would like some help with different colleges I maybe should look at. I am not what you may call rich, so colleges over 40,000 are out of the question. If you would help me out I would be very thankful. I apologize if I misspelled anything or my grammar is bad, that is something I still have to work on.
  • First of all, well on you for deciding what you want to do. The thing with undergrad is, it doesn't really matter what you major in unless you're going to use that job specific degree (prime example: engineering). What would be most helpful in your case? I'd say pre-law, philosophy, political science- all depending on what your interests are. Since you want to go corporate maybe major in business and take some courses that (you get credit for) are related to pre-law and will give you a good idea of what to expect in law school. As for the school you go to, if you qualify for scholarships and financial aid with an insignificant amount of loans, $40,000 isn't an issue (I mean a good scholarship). That being said, in state is a better option for you because it is more affordable. As long as the school has a good reputation for its academics and you take advantage of the resources and oppurtunities then area/name isn't all that matters. That's just my advice, you still have your preferences and will make the choice that's best for you.
  • I am a retired lawyer. It will be fine if you go to your state university. You will save a lot of money and receive fine preparation for law school. Any academic major is acceptable for law school. Most pre-law students choose history or political science. It will be easier to become a corporate lawyer if you go to on to one of the top fifty law schools after you receive your bachelor's degree. At law school, it will be essential for you to win a competitive position on the school's top law review (student-produced legal journal). Good luck.
  • The SOCIALIST/COMMUNIST LEFT accused Bush of going to war for OIL time and tie again! Called him a "war monger" and many other unmentionables. Now that the war is over, and the troops are coming home, as per Bush's scheduled departure, where is all the OIL they accused Bush of going after?? Where are the "SPOILS OF WAR" the dictator/war monger Bush went after??
  • How times have changed! The United States isn't the imperialistic, blood-for-oil war machine that it was just a few years ago. We've shed the "I ride alone" image and become acceptable in the world community. Every charge levied against the United States following the Iraq invasion is yesterday's news and America can again wage a just war. All we needed was a change of party at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Remember the hope and change where in 2008 we launched ourselves, lemming-like, into the abyss. Remember how it was then? We needed a historic figure to bring big changes to the country! No more George Bush and his war-fighting, oil-sucking, tough-talking, environment-stomping, grotesque-profit-making America. We were the ones we'd been waiting for! And in our euphoria we wanted a President who promised to sweep the old, degenerate America from the stage and replace her with something new. We got what we wished for. After all, what could be more interesting than watching a young and inexperienced President set out to transform America, empowered by electoral mandate and his party's control of Congress? And President Obama did not disappoint. He boldly borrowed $5 trillion dollars to spend on bailouts and stimulus and government programs on a scale unseen before. He took over health care, auto companies and student loans. He used the power of the purse and an army of regulators flamboyantly, to recast the United States as a socialist country. How exciting to live in these most interesting of times! And, of course, the promise turned into a curse. We have worse than nothing to show for record government spending and debt. Unemployment is stuck above 9% and we lose jobs "unexpectedly" with monotonous regularity. Gas and food prices are skyrocketing. We've extended jobless benefits into another welfare entitlement and 46 million people are on food stamps, another record. The economy has stalled and teeters on the brink of a disastrous backslide into a recession we never really escaped. And let's not forget America's historic credit downgrade and the waves of foreclosures. Iraq had been a festering sore in the Middle East for two decades when we invaded in 2003, rightly fearing that Saddam still possessed the chemical and biological weapons we knew he had -- and used - in the 1980s. Left-wing critics of George W. Bush immediately politicized the war and accused Bush of shedding "blood for oil." Too bad that wasn't true. After spending four thousand American lives and billions of dollars deposing a ruthless dictator, the very least we should have gotten out of the deal was a tanker a day full of Iraqi oil and ninety-nine-cent gasoline. But we didn't get even that. George W. took a Wilsonian turn and decided that the war was all about establishing Iraqi democracy. Bad idea. Iraq somehow turned out a European-style parliamentary democracy (why not an American presidential system?) that has severe difficulty forming governments. Instead of a pro-American regional ally and a guaranteed oil supply, we get P.C. blather from our government about green jobs, electric cars, and Iraqi democracy. o_O
  • Sat August 30, 2008 Iraq signs $3 billion oil deal with China BAGHDAD, Iraq (CNN) -- Iraq has signed its first major oil deal with a foreign company since the fall of Saddam Hussein's regime, a spokesman for the Iraqi Oil Ministry said Saturday. It was the first time in more than 35 years that Iraq has allowed foreign oil companies to do business inside its borders. The contract with the China National Petroleum Corporation could be worth up to $3 billion. It would allow the CNPC to develop an oil field in southern Iraq's Wasit province for about 20 years, Oil Ministry spokesman Assim Jihad said. Iraq's Cabinet must still approve the contract, but Jihad said that would happen soon and work could start within a few months.
  • President Bush's Cabinet agreed in April 2001 that 'Iraq remains a destabilising influence to the flow of oil to international markets from the Middle East' and because this is an unacceptable risk to the US 'military intervention' is necessary. Vice-president Dick Cheney, who chairs the White House Energy Policy Development Group, commissioned a report on 'energy security' from the Baker Institute for Public Policy, a think-tank set up by James Baker, the former US secretary of state under George Bush Snr. The report, Strategic Energy Policy Challenges For The 21st Century, concludes: 'The United States remains a prisoner of its energy dilemma. Iraq remains a de- stabilising influence to ... the flow of oil to international markets from the Middle East. Saddam Hussein has also demonstrated a willingness to threaten to use the oil weapon and to use his own export programme to manipulate oil markets. Therefore the US should conduct an immediate policy review toward Iraq including military, energy, economic and political/ diplomatic assessments. (1) Remember, also, that soon after the invasion, Donald Rumsfeld's deputy, Paul Wolfowitz, told the press that war was our only strategic choice. "We had virtually no economic options with Iraq," he explained, "because the country floats on a sea of oil (2) Secret memos expose link between oil firms and invasion of Iraq. (3)
  • Where is all that money Haliburton took (with their no bid contract) that is unaccounted for?
  • I currently attend a university in Pennsylvania and the second semester of my Freshman year is coming up. I did poorly my first semester and I am starting to think college just isn't for me. Also my family and I are having trouble paying tuition because we cannot find a cosigner for a loan. Would it be the best for me to finish up the semester, start working over the summer, go to a CC until i build up enough credits and earn enough money to pay for my tuition?
  • you could always do what im doing. Its cheaper. I am going to a community college for my AA degree and transferring to a university to finish up my education for my BA in special education. Community colleges aren't as bad as everyone thinks they are.But yea, i think you could finish up the quarter and then work the summer and attend a community college and go back for your junior and senior year at the university
  • Have you ever thought about joining the military? I know a lot of people who have attended a university and half way through realise it is not for them. Some may think university is the only way to get a job but thats not true. The military is a very rewarding career and you could join it for a specific time period until you decide whats best for you. The added benefit is that you will be serving your country! For more information, have a look at this website http://www.military-school.org Good luck :)
  • Study In evening, Earn in the day times But for god sake dont discontinue your studies, Once you loose interest you will never turn up
  • I'm going to be going into my fifth year as an undergrad at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania next fall and i'm really just wondering how the financial aid will work then. Will I still be able to get it? I want to try and graduate in December 2014 but I may have to wait till spring of 2015 depending on how things work out. But I just want to know how bad it will be financially if I do have to go the full year.
  • Yes, 5th year students can receive aid. There are limits on how much aid you can receive, but they are measured in other ways than the number of calendar years you are in school. For Pell, there is a lifetime limit of 12 semesters or 6 years of aid, but this is measured in percentages of your total award that you received for the year. For example, if you attended two semesters at full time, that would counted as two full semesters or one full year. But if you attended two semesters at only half time, that would be counted as one full semester, or half of a full year. For loans, there are aggregate limits to the amounts that you can receive. For example, a dependent student can only receive a total of $31,000. An independent can receive up to $57,500. For all aid, you must complete your program in 150% of the published normal completion time for the program you're in. For example, if you are in a bachelor's degree program for which the normal completion time is 4 years or 120 credits, you must complete it within 6 years or 180 credits or your aid will be cut off. If you're only in your 5th year, it's unlikely that you will be affected by the 150% completion rule, but you could very well be approaching your aggregate limits for loans. You would need to talk to your school's financial aid department to find out specifically what you can expect for the remaining time in your program.
  • Your school's Financial Aid office will have to tell you how much aid (need based or non-need based) you're eligible to receive based on EFC (Expected Family Contribution) and Cost of Attendance (COA). It really depends on what sources you utilize to fund your education as far as a cap is concerned.
  • I already know there is no way in hell I am getting boardwalk at this point so, I need, Pennsylvania Avenue, Ventor Avenue, Tennessee Avenue, Vermont Avenue. I am will to give away any and all other pieces that I get doubles of or are used on trips, I'm agoraphobic so traveling outside of places I'm used to going to are out of the question. So far I have: Illinios Ave x2 B&O railroad Penn. RailRoad Reading Railroad Atlantic Rail Road Pacific Railroad Oriental Railroad. I'm willing to trade all of those for one of the pieces I need. Preferably Penn Ave, cause I need a new car, student loans have my credit so low I can't buy a new one from a dealer unless I have it all up front, but that's another story. Money would be nice but a new car is top of my list right now.
  • it looks worth owning
  • Last time i checked monopoly only had 4 railroads just saying.
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