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State Oregon
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Loan amount limit Loan Terms:
Loan terms $50,000 (Loan limit up to 25%of borrower’s net monthly income if earns $60,000 per year or less.)
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1225 Southeast Tualatin Valley Highway, Hillsboro, OR 97123

Oregon

Hillsboro

265 Grant Smith Road No. 102, Roseburg, OR 97470

Oregon

Roseburg

3849 SE Powell Blvd, Portland, OR 97202

Oregon

Portland

347 NW Garden Valley Boulevard, Roseburg, OR 97470

Oregon

Roseburg

10763 SW Greenburg Road No. 100, Portland, OR 97223

Oregon

Portland

1457 Se Stephens Street, Roseburg, OR 97470

Oregon

Roseburg

1705 Lancaster Drive NE No. 100, Salem, OR 97305

Oregon

Salem

16705 SE McLoughlin Boulevard, Portland, OR 97267

Oregon

Portland

400 Sw Court Avenue, Pendleton, OR 97801

Oregon

Pendleton

259 E Barnett Road No. 3, Medford, OR 97501

Oregon

Medford


Frequently asked questions about fast cash in portland oregon

  • My husband is almost 53 and I am 45. After 35 years on the same job he is about to receive a "buyout" to retire early. We are selling our 2 Tri-plex rental properties that we have taken care of as our future nest egg for the past 22 years as well as our home that we custom design/built in 1992. California is too hot, dry, and the stress level of the "life in the fast lane" of the SF Bay Area has really gotten to us. We want cash out, sell everything, and move to Oregon and be retired. But where? We love trees, lakes, fishing and have just started to take up golf and tennis. We have 1 Jr. College age son and 1 High School Freshman daughter. (Our older daughter is already living on her own and in her senior year of college in California). Oregon seems to be much more affordable and more low key with less stress. Any suggestions?
  • I moved to Oregon eight years ago after living in Tokyo and Yokohama. My wife and I got out of "life in the fast lane," too. We have two children. We chose southern Oregon along Interstate 5 so that we could enjoy the lower stress but stay close to the amenities (colleges, arts, major shopping areas, airports). I don't recommend the Portland area. You're coming from the SF Bay Area. If you want trees, lakes and fishing (and golf and tennis), you don't want to hang around another major metropolitan city. Southern Oregon offers you four distinct seasons and far less rain than Portland. Over the past year, I've helped several other people who are retiring in Oregon. The links below are previous answers. http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;... http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;... http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;... Please don't hesitate to send me a direct message if you have additional questions. BTW: The best golf in Oregon is here: http://www.bandondunesgolf.com/ The best lake: http://www.traveloregon.com/Explore-Oregon/Southern-Oregon/Attractions/Outdoors-and-Nature/Crater-Lake-National-Park.aspx One of the best recreation areas: http://www.traveloregon.com/Explore-Oregon/Southern-Oregon.aspx And a little art for good measure: http://www.traveloregon.com/Explore-Oregon/Southern-Oregon/Arts-And-Culture/Search.aspx
  • Well congrats. on the retiring. I have just done that about a year ago. I have been looking for the same things to. Living in Sandy is quite low key and slow living for most anyone. It(Sandy) has started it growing like most towns in Oregon. It still has the small town charm, though. Medical facilities are not to far, and Portland is close by. The high school here is pretty good, due to a small crime rate, the kids seem pretty darn good. Home prices are beginning to rise, as all towns, but that just gives one a chance to invest for the five year investing. Located only 45 mins. from Mt. Hood lodge and even closer to many lakes and rivers, it offers a lot of outdoor fun. Eastern Oregon is at your finger-tips also. You can check out the home scene on realtor.com and see if it tickles your fancy. However, you best be able to enjoy a lot more rain than being in southern Cal. The rain does give us the green land, rivers, and snow pack for Mt. Hood. People have many diff. incomes and needs, so this is but one idea. This is a much calmer and relaxed area than So. Cal. or even Beaverton Oregon. This low key town that offers peace and relaxing is only one of many places to live. Good luck finding that special place.
  • Portland area is a good place to go. You have the smaller towns sirounding areas for good schools, there are lots of golf courses and your close to the mt and the ocean. Portland is Large so you have everything you will need or want and there are areas here that would be great for low key. Portland is a wonderful place to live there is public transportation for those who don't want to drive. We have great hospitals. I lived in small towns all my life and living in portland isn't as bad as i thought it has great parks. I don't know what else to say about Oregon or Portland its self I love it here. Portland is also close to Mt hood which has the best snow boarding, skiing and all the great llife for snow well thats what i was told
  • I misplaced a job at fifty 3 and yet another at fifty 4 so i understand how frustrating it somewhat is while human beings look at age like a handicap not a benefit. i chanced on a impressive corporation the place the traditional age is over 50 my boss is sixty 5 now so became 60 while i became fifty 4 and the ladies human beings I replaced became seventy one so i became regarded at as youthful. I had huge accounting and laptop skills and until eventually i became fifty 3 had labored eleven in application and became a CPA with my license lapsed and no present day adventure. application jobs have been down in the 2000-2002 and that they in particular needed little ones. The seventy twelve months previous that had my job eleven years became fearful of pcs and my boss became the sole one in the corporation that knew a lot approximately them. He enjoyed having somebody who wasn't afraid to do backups or deploy application advancements. i'm working in a shipyard and adventure is seen an asset. they're attempting to not enable human beings retire however the union human beings get to retire with pensions so we are dropping them of their 50s. some non union each physique is over sixty 5 with 40 years adventure so they fee it greater beneficial than a clean out of faculty supervisor ought to. seek for older companies that employ older workers, attempt to look alive and energetic. shed pounds, die your hair or despite to look such as you're as youthful as you could look. do not flow overboard looking youthful yet sturdy posture and different signs and indicators you're alert. Then keep in mind the reward of adulthood like understanding to not make own telephone calls at paintings. you will detect a chairman who values adulthood. in case you do not flow forward and commence a corporation might commence a CPA corporation because of the fact I have already got all i prefer different than 40-eighty hours persevering with coaching.
  • I would look at Bend Oregon. It is nestled in the mountains near Mt. Bachelor and surrounded by lots of great hiking and fishing and of course gold. I don't think you would be disappointed.
  • Corvallis is allright. Not too big, not to small. It's a college town so that should be cool for your kids. Newport is really quiet, but there's nothing there for your kids. It's about 40 mins. from Corvallis.
  • Crater Lake is nice
  • eugene its a nice place
  • portland
  • I have 2 kids 4 and 8 and Im flying will be there 4days and 3 nights. I have no idea what knid of budget to have airfare and hotel and gate tickets have been bought so it's just food and entertainment. I don't want to go cheap but I don't want to break the bank. maybe a $2000.00 spending limit? is that too low too high? I know nothing about this never been. any info will be helpful. coming from portland,Oregon
  • Oh, I have LOTS of experience with this. My kids are currently 5 and 3 and we have gone to Disneyland for the last 3 years. If you already have the Hotel, Airfare and Tickets, then here is what I will assume you hav left. Rental Car?? If so, you will need about $200 - $250 set aside for that. You may or may not need a booster seat for your 4 year old according to CA Law and that will cost you an additional $8 - $10 a day if you rent one from the agency, or to save money you can check one you have with your luggage. If you do have a rental, then you will also need to figure about $40 - $50 gas for the trip. Also, depending on where your hotel is (if it's off property), then you will have a parking fee when you go to the park each day. Unless, you are able to walk. Don't forget about setting aside cash for getting your car out of the Airport Long Term Parking when you return (unless someone dropped you off). Now, your biggest expense for the whole trip is going to be FOOD! I have always been successful following the Rachel Ray $40 a day rule of thumb. (I half that to $20 for the kids). Before we leave, I take $20 bills and actually divide them by each day of the trip. So $80 a day minimum x 4 days = $320. If you know that you are going to dine at an expensive dinner one night or a Character Breakfast one morning, then add to that accordingly. You can of course, always do this with credit cards, but if trying to stay on a budget, it makes it much easier to stick to if using cash. I, myself, would go ahead and plan on $500 for food to give yourself a cushion. (Snacks and treats at Disneyland are killer!) We bought a $7.00 sucker without even realizing it. And, 4 hot dogs, chips and 4 sodas at a counter in Disney will cost around $40. Best to eat a big breakfast before you go in the gates each day, get a light snack for lunch and then eat a substantial dinner either on or off property. Your next expense is going to be souvenires. I'm almost positive that the kids are going to want a few of these things. 1) An autograph book for the characters to sign. 2) A lanyard and possibly pins for the lanyard 3) Mickey Ears Hat (Maybe). I would set aside a FIXED budget for these type of items and tell them (and yourself) that once it's gone, it's gone. Probably $250. Sounds like a lot, but those little what-nots add up super fast. Plus, you will no doubt see some things you want for yourself. Like a candid portrait by a Disney Character of the three of you to commemorate your visit. They are all over Disney with cameras and they show you how to pose so it looks like Tinkerbell is in your hand. They give you a receipt and you can pick your picture up in an hour with Tinkerbell transposed in. It's great and worth the $20. Don't forget tipping expenses. Regardless of how generous you like to be with that, just remember to plan that in your budget. (Shuttles, Hotel, Valet, etc.) Also, I hope you have Park Hopper tickets because California Adventure is not to be missed and they have moved the nightly Electrical Parade to that park, so you won't get to see it unless you have Park Hopper tickets. Plus, I highly recommend Bug Town for your 4 year old and Roarin Rapids for your 8 year old at California Adventure. There are lots of rides at California Adventure that you can all enjoy together like the HUGE ferris wheel. At Disney, the Snow White show is amazing as well. If you are wanting to splurge for a real treat and experience that the kids will always remember, make reservations at Goofy's Kitchen for a Character Dinner. All of the characters will come to their table and Goofy puts on a little skit in the middle of the restaurant every 15 minutes. So fun, and the food was very good, too. It will cost about $80.00 for the 3 of you. (My 5 year old daughter liked the Goofy's Kitchen better than the Princess Lunch!) Seems like all you have left is the incidentals that you can't plan for because they just come up unexpectedly. For example, if you are not prepared, you could potentially have to purchase items like sunscreen, sunglasses, flip-flops, stroller rental, bottled water, dry clothes, wet wipes, etc. These incidental expenses can all be avoided with a little pre-planning. But, I guarantee you that you will need them all, so just bring a a nice sized bag to carry bottles of water, sunscreen, wipes, sunglasses, etc. These items can all be purchased at Disney at a very high premium. (I mention the stroller rental, because depending on the 4 year old, they will get tired before the 8 year old and you may have to rent a stroller to keep the day from getting cut short.) A couple of tips if I may: FIRST, If going to Bug's Town in California Adventure, ride the rides BEFORE your kids get in the water structures. They will not let you on the rides once you are wet. SECOND, do put your kids in shoes like Crocs or something that is comfortable like slip-ons, but does not require socks. They will get wet and then be miserable. THIRD, do pack some extra dry clothes in your bag for the day. FOURTH, Have fun! :) All in all, it looks like your $2000 budget will be more than ample. Probably twice what you will NEED. But, Disney has a way of cleaning your pockets, so if you want to spend all of it, believe me you will find a way. But, looks like $1000 will take care of everything. ENJOY!
  • If you are in walking distance or your hotel has a free Disney shuttle, that will save you money. If you are renting a car, you will pay like $15 or $20 to park for the day. Food in Disneyland is expensive - I would budget about $120 - 150/day for food, unless you eat outside. The rest would be souvenirs. When I took my two boys years ago, I gave them each a "budget" of disney dollars to spend each day. They could buy whatever they wanted, but that was it for the day. Also, if you do like to get souvenirs, you'll want to rent a locker. In fact, you might want to leave some things in there anyway - jackets, umbrellas in case of rain. You might want to rent a stroller for your 4-year-old as well. Little ones get tired of walking and have a hard time keeping up with adults and older siblings. I would say that for that length of time, $1,000 should more than cover your expenses for a very nice time. One more hint - there is a system called "fast-pass" at the most popular rides. What you do there is show up well before you plan on riding the ride. Slip your tickets into one of the machines - it should have signs directing you - and it will return them, along with reservation tickets. The reservation tickets have a time on them - a 1-hour window in which you can come back to the ride, and go to the "fast-pass" line. People who don't know about this think that all the people have an unfair advantage because the fast-pass line moves very quickly and you get right on instead of waiting for sometimes over an hour. But the ticket is like saving your place in line, so you can go on other rides during that time. You will need this for rides like Space Mountain, Splash Mountain, and the Indiana Jones Adventure. Of course, your 4-year-old is too young for some of those.
  • If travel and lodging are all taken care of. $2000.00 should be way more than enough for you and your small children. Most of your entertainment will be provided at Disney. Food in the park is a bit pricey, but you probably would only need lunch/snacks. Do breakfast at the hotel (usually included) and dinner outside of the park. Even if you did dinner at Disney I cannot see a 4 and 8 yr old eating thru your budget. When we took our small children to Disney World. They tired of it and wanted to go back to hotel and swim. The best thing to do is go there with a fluid plan and go with the flow....you will be much more relaxed and everyone should have a good time. Good luck
  • flow for the bigger points of interest in Disneyland Tokyo The climate there is better too, with the exception of being better spacious No damage sorting out the Disneyland-HK for the adventure although ....
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