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State Oklahoma
Legal status
Allowed (Our partner lenders provide payments in Oklahoma)
Loan amount limit $500
Loan terms 12-45 days
Finance rates $15 per $100: $0-$300;  an additional fee of $10 per $100: $301-$500
Finance charges $15
Maximum APR (Annual percentage rate) 390%

919 Arlington Street, Ada, OK 74820

Oklahoma

Ada

322 North Lynn Riggs Boulevard, Claremore, OK 74017

Oklahoma

Claremore

900 S Broadway, Edmond, OK 73034

Oklahoma

Edmond

1906 SE Washington Blvd., Bartlesville, OK 74006

Oklahoma

Bartlesville

4636 S Pennsylvania Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73119

Oklahoma

Oklahoma City

1474 N Main Street, Altus, OK 73521

Oklahoma

Altus

2401 12th Avenue Northwest, Ardmore, OK 73401

Oklahoma

Ardmore

852 Garth Brooks Boulevard, Yukon, OK 73099

Oklahoma

Yukon

2410 N Meridian Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73107

Oklahoma

Oklahoma City

234 S Muskogee Avenue, Tahlequah, OK 74464

Oklahoma

Tahlequah


Frequently asked questions about online loans oklahoma

  • He wants to take some classes, and he heard that there is an option where he can be active in the Army but still go to college 2 days a week, or something along the lines of that. Does anyone know anything more about this option, and other options he has? I know he could take some online classes but would he get time off from work for them? (I told him I'd research it all for him for when he got back from the field). Thank you!
  • He's currently in the Army, stationed in S.Korea, has been in for nearly 2 years. I don't know if he wants to go Officer (probably not), but he does want to get some classes done leading to a degree. Is he eligible for this Green to Gold program bearing all that in mind and even if he didn't complete high school? The main option he asked me to research was one where he stays active in the Army, but attends college like 2 days a week. I don't even know if there is such a program!
  • There's online You can take night, lunch, and weekend classes through a college/university at the Ed Center. See what colleges are at your Ed Center. For example, here in Grafenwoehr, Germany we can take classes through: http://www.grafenwoehr.army.mil/sites/su... University of Maryland University College (UMUC) Website: http://www.ed.umuc.edu Central Texas College (CTC) Website: http://www.europe.ctcd.edu University of Phoenix Website: http://military.phoenix.edu Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Website: http://www.erau.edu/europe University of Oklahoma (OU) Website: http://www.goou.ou.edu There is also the Green to Gold Active Duty Option Program. http://www.goarmy.com/rotc/green_to_gold_active_duty.jsp From an E-Mail: Active Duty Option. This is a 2 year option. Requires 60 college credits and junior standing with 2.5 GPA. You stay on Active Duty while going to school full time, with all your current pay and allowances. You are responsible for your tuition, fees, and other school costs. You may use your GI bill, loans, and other student financial aid (including scholarships and grants awarded by the school), but cannot use Army Tuition Assistance. Great option for soldiers with families (because you keep your medical benefits), and soldiers who are making good money now (E6-E7 with over 8 years time in service). E-Mail attachment Green To Gold is a program for soldiers currently on active duty to earn an officer's commission and college degree as full time students through Army ROTC. Soldiers may choose to attend any of the 1100 colleges and universities that have Army ROTC programs. There are three Green To Gold Options: Active Duty Option, Scholarship Option, and Non-Scholarship Option. Each has different eligibility requirements and benefits. All Green To Gold options require: o 110 GT score. o No permanent profiles. o US citizen. o Not a single parent. o Eligible to reenlist. o Under age 39 (with waiver) at time of commissioning (under age 31 for Scholarship Option). Active Duty Option - most competitive, most benefits. Soldier remains on Active Duty while going to school full time, retains all pay and allowances. Competitive -- 200 openings available each year across the Army. To apply submit an application packet to Cadet Command NLT 1 APR. Additional eligibility requirements: - At least 60 college credits and able to complete degree in 2 years (bachelor or masters). - 2.5 GPA on completed college work. E-Mail attachment (it says OU because that is the University I'm thinking about) Basic eligibility: - US citizenship; - 110 GT score; - under age 39 upon commissioning (under 31 for scholarship option); - no permanent profiles, pass an APFT, and pass a commissioning physical; - between 2 and 10 years active federal service (waiver may be requested); - no criminal convictions (waiver may be requested); no domestic violence convictions; - For Active Duty Option and non-scholarship option: 60 credits completed with at least 2.5 GPA (Active Duty Option) or 2.0 (non-scholarhsip). - less than 30 college credits, you must have at least a 2.5 GPA (high school or college, if 12 or more credits) and an ACT (or SAT) score of 19 (or 920); - no more than 3 dependents, including spouse; - not flagged or barred from reenlistment. - Be accepted to OU. (Note that while GTG only requires a 2.5 GPA, OU Admissions generally requires freshman to have a 3.0 HS GPA and 24 ACT.) If applying for Active Duty or Non- Scholarship Options, you must be admitted with Junior class standing. There are two Green To Gold selection boards each year. The fall board, with a deadline of 1 OCT, is only for Scholarship Option applications. The spring board, with a deadline of 1 APR, looks at Active Duty Option and Scholarship Option applications. The spring selection board actually meets in May, and results come out in early June. If selected you would start school that August as a full-time student. For the fall board, the board meets in November and selectees start school in January. Active Duty Option is a two-year program and requires you to begin school as a junior. Generally that means 56-60 credits, but the real bottom line is that no matter how many credits you have the school (OU) has to admit you as a junior. (Note that if you won’t have the required credits before the application deadline, but are enrolled in classes that will give you the required credits, you can still be considered. The key is to have the Admissions Office write in your acceptance letter that you have so many credits and are enrolled in so many credits, and that upon successful completion of those classes you will be considered an academic Junior.) While you are in the program, you are still on Active Duty so you keep all your current pay and allowances, and continue to accrue leave, etc. You are responsible for your tuition and fees: you may use your GI bill, but may not use Army tuition assistance. You may use GI bill benefits, other scholarships, and school or federal financial aid, but may not use Army tuition assistance. You must have 4 semesters (fall/spring, fall/spring) in the ROTC program, must be a full time student each semester, and must take one military science class each semester. In the summer after your first year you will go to Ft. Lewis for 6 weeks for LDAC – Leadership Development and Assessment Camp. We do PT 3 days a week, and one weekend FTX in the fall and spring. The rest of the time is yours – we don’t have CQ, morning or release formations, staff duty, etc. Weekends are off, fall and spring break are off. Not a bad deal. Active Duty Option is the most selective of the three Green To Gold options – the selection rate is about 85%, and there are only 200 slots available, nationally, each year. But, it is definitely do-able.
  • He should have an Education Officer in his unit. He really needs to let his chain of command know what he wants to do. They are the ones that will ultimately allow him, or not, to attend college. It has to be approved by his command before he can do anything.
  • I lost my home to foreclosure. The paperwork is confusing to me. I have been getting letters from Real Time Resolutions saying we owe $10,010.00.. I thought in OK you had to be sued for A deficiency seperate from the foreclosure within 90 days. The online records show as Foreclosure. They are threatening us with bank levy and wage garnishment. When I asked for Debt verification they sent me copies of the Mortgage papers we signed when we bought the house. Help with any info you have please.
  • In oklahoma a deficiency suit has to be done within 90 days. The foreclosure is a year old. Also I have no idea what the house sold for. The only documents I have say I have a judgment for a foreclosure and the amount owed on the home was over 50000.00 . It says a lien is put on the house and it is to be sold at a sheriffs sell and proceeds paid to the mortgage holder. Noone ever served me papers to go back to court for a deficiency suit. So how can my wages be garnished, or my bank levied?
  • Depending on the TYPE of loan you have, the lender has the right to go after you for the difference between what they were able to sell your home for and the balance of the loan. It sounds like you had the type of loan that allows them to do that. Foreclosure doesn't always absolve you 100% from your mortgage, again, depending on what type of loan you had. You should consult with a loan broker to review your mortgage papers with you if you are having trouble determining whether or not this debt balance is valid. If it turns out to be valid, then you'll have to make payment arrangements or offer a lump sum payoff (reduced) amount. Filing bankruptcy is only an option if your TOTAL debt far, far exceeds your income with no chance of things turning around anytime soon.
  • Even if you aren't doing this, tell them you will be filing for bankruptcy. And tell them the house has gone through foreclosure. What these guys do is utilize threatening tactics to frighten people - sometimes they get money out of them so the tactic works. I don't know what the specific laws are regarding this but you can buy yourself some time.
  • Well did the lender get to sell the house for what was still owed? If not the lender has the right to come back and fight for what is still owed. Review your contract. Many people are having this issue because their home value is lower the what they owe. when selling they'll have to sell for less and still owing the lender to satisfy the debt.
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