make money online no selling.com

Find money online for fast debt

makemoneyonlinenoselling.com is online service which helps you acquire cash money online


Flag
State Ohio
Legal status
Allowed (Our partner lenders provide payments in Ohio)
Loan amount limit $500
Loan terms Minimum: 31 days
Finance rates 28% annual interest
Finance charges $1.08
Maximum APR (Annual percentage rate) 28%

1259 Log Pond Drive, Newark, OH 43055

Ohio

Newark

1956 Elm Road Northeast, Warren, OH 44483

Ohio

Warren

1200 E Central Avenue, Miamisburg, OH 45342

Ohio

Miamisburg

6516 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, OH 45014

Ohio

Fairfield

3515 Hudson Drive, Stow, OH 44224

Ohio

Stow

5143 Salem Avenue, Dayton, OH 45426

Ohio

Dayton

21177 Euclid Avenue, Euclid, OH 44117

Ohio

Euclid

29 Midway Plaza, Tallmadge, OH 44278

Ohio

Tallmadge

4170 Cleveland Massillon, Barberton, OH 44203

Ohio

Barberton

1270 East 260th Street, Euclid, OH 44132

Ohio

Euclid


Frequently asked questions about check cashing cleveland ohio

  • Hi. I'm also from Cuyahoga County. You would need to deal with the Probate court. This court gives marriage licenses etc and is located downtown in Cleveland. (Right next to city hall) Parking is $6 or so, so be sure to bring some cash with you unless you take the bus. According to the forms below, you will need to follow the protocol of trying to "find the father." first they may check the Putative Father Registry (http://csea.cuyahogacounty.us/en-US/puta... then you will need to place an ad in the paper. Information for the newspaper ad is on the first form and I'm sure the court will give you more information. (If you want help in finding the father for the best will of the child, the above website can help. CSEA offers free paternity testing as well as their own court to get child support. They are also near downtown.) EDIT: There is absolutely ZERO need for your husband to adopt your child. You may consider legal guardianship, but there is no need for an adoption to take place in order for a name change to occur!!!!!!!!!! !!
  • Csea Cuyahoga County
  • First: get your information from Ohio government websites. It will be free and closer to accurate than any of the pay-for-service sites. A few places to get you started: Cuyahoga County, Ohio government website: http://www.cuyahogacounty.us/index.asp Scroll down to 21.2 Application for change of name for a minor http://www.supremecourt.ohio.gov/LegalResources/Rules/superintendence/probate_forms/Default.asp Forms: Cuyahoga County, Ohio http://probate.cuyahogacounty.us/forms.htm Great place for self-help, forms, and interim queries: Nolo Press http://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/question-28235.html This is an example of a service-for-pay website. Please realize that anything form they have in their package can be had for free at your county courthouse. http://www.findlegalforms.com/product/ohio-name-change-kit-adult/
  • If he is younger then 2 years then it can be done at the court house. They give you 2 years to decide if you like the name you choose at the hospital. If it is beyond that then I think maybe you have to go to court or pay court cost to get it done. Either way the court house will know.
  • Just go up to the courthouse and file the paperwork. I think it costs around $100.
  • town clerks office fill out a paper ..40 bucks
  • I think the only way to change his last name to your husband's name is that your husband needs to adopt him.
  • I would expect that you would apply at Registrar for Births, marriages and Deaths. (hatches, matches and despatches)
  • Quit Claim deed, under $30 must sign it in front of a notary. Easy Process. _________________ further detail below How to File/Record a Quit Claim in Cuyahoga County Ohio Any one of the four parties involved can file and record a quit-claim deed. One party will need to go to 1219 Ontario in Cleveland Ohio to complete the filing and recording process. First you will need to bring a copy of the current deed on record, the new quit claim deed form *that is now notarized*, and your license. Filing and Recording must be done the SAME DAY. The office hours are Monday – Friday 8:30am – 4:00pm. They are open until 4:30pm BUT WILL NOT ACCEPT applications AFTER 4:00pm. Once inside the building you will first need to go to room 315 for filing. 315 in on the second floor. In room 315 you will need to pay $0.50 *cash only* as a transfer fee and you will receive an engineer stamp. After Filing you will need to go to room 220 *also on the second floor* for recording. The fee for room 220 is $28 for the first 2 pages, and $8 per page after. You can pay in cash, check or money order. The new deed will be enforced immediately same day once the forms are recorded. For further questions pertaining to the quit-claim deed the contact number for Patrick D. O’Malley’s office is 216-443-7318. ___________________________________ WHAT This Quitclaim Deed form is used to convey an interest in real estate without any guarantee about the nature or quality of that interest, or even if any interest exists at all. WHY In most real estate transactions, the buyer desires to obtain the maximum ownership interest (a fee simple estate) and the promise from the seller that no one will later challenge the buyer's ownership interest. This kind of conveyance is usually made through an instrument known as a general warranty deed. However, there are many cases where a party is unable to transfer a fee simple estate or make promises about the title. For example, it is not unusual for an attorney or title insurance company examining title for real estate to discover that a particular conveyance was not made of record, or that some relative of a prior owner may have a claim on the real estate. To clear up the title to the real estate, that individual may be asked to convey whatever interest he or she has to the current owner. This kind of conveyance, where there is no promise about the interest conveyed or about the quality of title, is made through a quitclaim deed. A quitclaim deed is rarely accepted by a buyer as the sole form of conveyance when buying land. It is usually used only in family situations or to correct possible technical defects in the title to the land. HOW Like all other kinds of transfers of interest in real estate, a quitclaim transfer must be in writing to be enforceable. Each state has its own particular established forms for all kinds of deeds, including quitclaim deeds. When acknowledged before a notary public and recorded, it should make a proper quitclaim conveyance. TITLE ISSUES Before accepting a deed, no matter what kind it is, the transferee should be fully aware of the extent and condition of the interest he or she is receiving. This can only be accomplished by a thorough review of the title to the property being transferred. Such a review is best made by a title company or a lawyer familiar with the real estate laws and practices where the real estate is located. If the review is made by a title company, it should then be willing to issue a title commitment. A title commitment is a legally binding promise by the title company to issue an insurance policy protecting the transferee against defects in the title to the property, subject to exclusions and exceptions noted in the policy. The transferee should then consult with the attorney to determine what steps should be taken to clear up any defects in the title, or make other arrangements to protect the transferee's interest. PREPARING DEEDS • Names - Be sure the names of the transferor and transferee are properly spelled out. If a name used varies from a form used on a previous deed related to the same property, such as due to a marriage or divorce, note that. Identify whether each party is single, married, or widowed, whether the execution of the deed is by an attorney-in-fact (i.e., an agent for one of the parties), or other special circumstances. If the transferor is married, even though the property is held in his or her name alone, the signature of the spouse is essential to convey the marital interest provided by law. • Legal description - Make sure that the legal description of the property is accurate. The method of describing property varies from state to state and from location to location. Descriptions may be by meets and bounds, by survey reference, or by reference to a book and page of a plat. Check with the county recorder of deeds for a copy of previous deeds related to the land if necessary. You can simply attach a photocopy of the legal description to the deed, as long as you refer to the photocopy exhibit in the body of the deed document. • Corporations - In most states, attestation (i.e., signature) by the corporate secretary is not necessary to complete a corporate conveyance. However, it may be required by the corporation's articles or by-laws. If a corporation is a transferor, it is also wise to prepare the appropriate corporate resolution authorizing the corporate officer to execute the deed. If a corporation has a seal, an imprint of that seal should be affixed to the deed. In most states, where the seal is missing, it is acceptable to draw a circle and hand write the words "Corporate Seal". Also note that in most states, a deed of conveyance from a corporation that has forfeited its charter, often for the failure to pay taxes or file reports, is void. Transferees should request a certificate of good standing from the secretary of state in the state where the corporation is formed to insure that the transfer is effective. • Partnerships - The Uniform Partnership Act, now enacted in almost every state, permits a partnership to hold title to real estate in its own name. It is usually appropriate for a partnership resolution to be prepared authorizing the conveyance and execution of the deed. The partnership agreement should be reviewed to make sure that the conveyance of property complies with the terms of that agreement. • Witnesses - A minority of states require that the execution of a deed be witnessed, as well as notarized. Check with a local attorney or the local recorder of deeds to find out if witnesses are required. • Execution - Most states require that the signatures on a deed must also be accompanied by a corresponding typed, printed, or stamped name under the signature itself. Even where this is not required, it is always good practice. • Acknowledgment - Most deeds have particular requirements as to the form of acknowledgment. The Quitclaim Deed should satisfy the requirements of most states. Your local recorder of deeds or business stationery store can probably supply you with the statutory form of acknowledgment used in your state if needed. • Delivery - To be effective, a deed must be delivered during the lifetime of the transferor. However, delivery to a third party as agent for the transferee, or for eventual delivery to the transferee usually will suffice. Also, recording the deed should constitute delivery. In fact, the law in most states assumes that no delivery has taken place if a deed is not recorded, and is later found in the possession of the transferor at the time of his or her death. Recording is done at the county offices in the county where the land is located. That office may be called the Recorder of Deeds, Office of Public Records, or similar name.
  • Quick Claim Deed Ohio
  • Quit Claim Deed Ohio
  • The executor (the person in charge of the deceased assets) of the will will have to sign the deed over to your husband's name. There is a chance that the will is still in probate and for what ever reason can't be signed over yet.
  • See the court clerk and tell him/her the problem and tell them you wand a deed in your husband's name. The court can grant you a deed if you have the will.
  • You need an attorney to do this.
  • I-90 is not a toll road in Pennsylvania. So no need to check the PA Turnpike's website. And the Port Authority has nothing to do with I-90, so no need to check their website either. This obviously is going to be dependent on where you enter I-90 in Indiana and where you exit I-90 in New York. In Ohio, I-90 only runs on the Ohio Turnpike between the Indiana state line and Exit 142 where it then exits the Turnpike heading through Cleveland on its way to Erie and Buffalo. The toll in Ohio would be $6.75 with EZ Pass and $9.75 with cash. For tolls on the Indiana Toll Road: https://www.ezpassin.com/tollRatesRedire... For tolls on the New York State Thruway: http://www.thruway.ny.gov/travelers/toll...
  • Tolls sometimes change with the time of day, use of EZ Pass, etc. I suggest you check the websites of the Pennsylvania Turnpike Authority and equivalents for Ohio, NJ, and the Port Authority.
  • What is the name of your state (only U.S. law)? Ohio Hello! I owe my landlord $245.00. He claims that I owe him "at least" $320.00. I verified that I owed the rent of $245.00 through bank statements and the money order for the month of May. I sent him an email stating that I would send $50.00 until paid in full. I then sent him a check for $100.00 on August 22, 2011 with a letter stating that I would pay $100.00 immediately (with the check enclosed) and the remaining $145.00 on September 16. He has yet to cash the check and he has yet to respond to any emails being sent to him. I like to send emails as that is our primary form of communication. What can I do? Would this show good faith to a judge to prove that I've been attempting to pay the debt owed?
  • I have some good responses here. Let me tell you additional information. I have attempted to come to an agreement with him. Every times I want to talk about an agreement, he never responds to the emails. Never. I sent the check to show him that I am making a good faith effort to pay the amount. I am on a month to month lease, but I assume he thinks that I am going to pay late fees. I am going to deny it stating that the lease was effectively changed when he never requested the late fees and didn't file a detainer with the court. I do all my business with him by email. This way I have a record of everything. I never see him here nor can I get him by the phone as his wife or his children would state that he isn't there... I wish I could just show up at his house...
  • M.W. Several Ohio Courts have stated that when a late fee is involved, then the lawyer must show actual damages received by not paying the fee on time. Other Ohio Courts have stated that when an extended period of time has elapsed and the fee is not requested, then the contract is deemed to have been modified based on the late fee provision. "A party may voluntarily relinquish a known right through words or by conduct. State ex rel. Ford v. Cleveland Bd. Of Edn. (1943), 141 Ohio St. 124. In Galaxy Development Ltd. Partnership v. Quadax, Inc., 2000 Ohio App. LEXIS 4651 (October 5, 2000) Cuyahoga Co. App. No. 76769, the Eighth District Court of Appeals found that the landlord waived its right to collect holdover rent from the tenant by continuing to accept the original rental payments after expiration of the lease." BTW I'm on a month to month lease.
  • The problem could be that YOU decided how you wanted to pay (and how much) what you owe without consulting with him and coming to an agreement together. He's probably waiting for the final check on Sept 16, but you need to talk to him way before that to make sure he agrees with your chosen payment plan. He should show you documents that prove you owe $320.00. Tenant/Landlord disputes happen all the time, but usually they can be worked out. If the lease has a provision for late charges, he doesn't have to file any kind of complaint with a court, and the fact that he didn't directly ask, doesn't change the fact that the lease allows for late charges. Sounds like you owe it, prepare to pay. Meet with him in person to settle it once and for all. You don't need to take it to a level where a judge is involved. The courts have bigger issues to deal with than your dispute over a clause in your lease for $75.00 in late charges.
  • Did you break the lease that you had with your landlord? If that's the case, you really need to look at your lease to see if there is a fee for breaking your lease early. Otherwise, I'm not sure you really have a case to take to a judge. You'll probably have to just pay the amount due.
  • You can use your acts to show that you attempted to pay. If you are asking if that is legally significant in some way, it is not. Your attempt to pay will not prevent eviction.
  • I'm a sophomore in high school and right now I've really been thinking about art school as a future. I'd be studying graphic design and photography as majors and something metal works, sculpting, or wood work as a minor(mostly just for fun and it'd be something to do in my free time to make extra cash). I've looked at Pennsylvania College of Art and Design, UArt in Philly, Antonelli, and Lycoming(not an art school but a tier 1 art program). What are some other ones that you would recommend? And is PCA&D a legit college or is just one that's in it for the money? I'm not really sure with it.
  • I'd rather you look only at regionally accredited schools, so that if necessary, your classes can transfer to another school, or you can go on to grad school should you choose to do so. That eliminates Antonelli. PCA&D is regionally accredited, so they're legit. They aren't well ranked, though. I don't know Lycoming. U of the Arts is the strongest art school on your list. You're from PA, and one notable absence from your list is Temple U. They are an elite level art school, and they are also a public uni, so for you, a major bargain. Well worth considering. Some well respected art schools in your area: RISD, Maryland Institute, Carnegie Mellon, Bard, Pratt, School of Visual Arts, Parsons, Hunter College, Ohio State U, Rochester Institute of Tech, Indiana U Bloomington, Rutgers New Brunswick, Mass Art, NYU, Tufts (SMFA Boston), Herron School of Art, U Cincinnati, Penn, Cleveland Institute of Art, Cornell, Syracuse, Virginia Commonwealth. The best schools for GD in your area are RISD, VCU, Carnegie Mellon, Maryland Institute, SVA. You need to check the schools to make sure they offer the minors you want. I think minoring in the subjects you mentioned is a great idea.
  • 1
  • I went to Lycoming and although it IS a great school, especially if you are looking for a smaller, liberal arts education, a place where you can be a "big fish in the little pond" rather than the little fish lost in the big pond, it isn't really well known for its art programs. They are quite strong in the sciences, and have a great archaeology program, among other things. It's an excellent school with a very large proportion of tenured/PhD professors, so you wouldn't be learning from teaching assistants or graduate students, but, if you are committed to a strong art program, probably you are better off taking the other guy's advice above. :) Good luck!
  • 2
  • If I needed to prefer one, I suppose i might go along with... Ugh! I would must say Med college. Should you were without a doubt watching for a profession involving both, you might end up a medical Illustrator. They are the folks who create the diagrams (both with paper/presents and digitally) seeing that i have a robust interest in both subject matters, scientific illustration entails each, therefore i've been watching into that.
  • It's a scam Did you enter this contest? If not, how can you win. This is a definite scam. If you send them the money, you'll be out the cash. In fact, your deposit of their fake check will cause a charge already to your account, so you're already down some money. Do yourself a favor, cut off all communication before they trick you out of more cash Mike - River Edge, New Jersey U.S.A. Rebuttal Consumer Comment Submitted: 10/9/2006 1:19:38 PM Modified: 10/9/2006 1:19:38 PM It's a scam, keep your money Here is how it works..... 1)you deposit their check for $5351 2)you withdraw $2505 and western union it to them thinking you are $2800 ahead still 3)bank calls you a week or 2 later saying check is no good 4)you are out $2505 Chuck - Midlothian, Virginia U.S.A. Rebuttal Consumer Comment Submitted: 10/9/2006 1:31:54 PM Modified: 10/9/2006 1:31:54 PM Its a ripoff As soon as you wire them money you will discover that their "check" is bad and will not clear your bank. RUN AWAY. Remember the golden rule...if it sounds too good to be true, it is. Fred - Cleveland, Ohio U.S.A.
  • Scam. You must think, have u ever signed up? or bought a lotto from them? This world ain't that easy that people will give u money. They want it easy, and they might succeed if you pay them. So let it go. you said u could really use the money, u should work for it. everybody needs money, not only you. it wont just fall from heaven. Comprende?
  • Of course you won....... along with a few thousand other people that just happened to be notified the same day you were. I want you to stop and multiply that amount a few thousand times. They are looking for suckers to send in their hard earned money so they can divide it among themselves nothing else! I would not only drop it I would report it to the Better Business Bureau. You will be better off letting them not only squash it but, also save a grandma's life saving.
  • SCAM SCAM SCAM. Anytime you have to pay money to get money, you are being scammed. Its too bad that you e-mailed them your info. I hope there was no personal information in there like your social security number, a credit card number or anything like that. DO NOT GIVE THEM ANY MONEY. You are being played big time.
  • did you enter Hot Lotto..if not then how and why would you win...it's a scam,don't send any money and set your spam filter on your e-mail so this goes to your junk mail
  • YES DO NOT REPLY, THIS IS A SCAM.
  • tell them to deduct it from your winnings.
Fast percent loan in Alabama Fast percent loan in Alaska Fast percent loan in Arizona Fast percent loan in Arkansas Fast percent loan in California Fast percent loan in Colorado Fast percent loan in Connecticut Fast percent loan in Delaware Fast percent loan in Florida Fast percent loan in Georgia Fast percent loan in Hawaii Fast percent loan in Idaho Fast percent loan in Illinois Fast percent loan in Indiana Fast percent loan in Iowa Fast percent loan in Kansas Fast percent loan in Kentucky Fast percent loan in Louisiana Fast percent loan in Maine Fast percent loan in Maryland Fast percent loan in Massachusetts Fast percent loan in Michigan Fast percent loan in Minnesota Fast percent loan in Mississippi Fast percent loan in Missouri Fast percent loan in Montana Fast percent loan in Nebraska Fast percent loan in Nevada Fast percent loan in New Hampshire Fast percent loan in New Jersey Fast percent loan in New Mexico Fast percent loan in New York Fast percent loan in North Carolina Fast percent loan in North Dakota Fast percent loan in Ohio Fast percent loan in Oklahoma Fast percent loan in Oregon Fast percent loan in Pennsylvania Fast percent loan in Rhode Island Fast percent loan in South Carolina Fast percent loan in South Dakota Fast percent loan in Tennessee Fast percent loan in Texas Fast percent loan in Utah Fast percent loan in Vermont Fast percent loan in Virginia Fast percent loan in Washington Fast percent loan in West Virginia Fast percent loan in Wisconsin Fast percent loan in Wyoming