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State North Carolina
Legal status 🚫
Prohibited

329 E Marion Street, Shelby, NC 28150

North Carolina

Shelby

5800 North Sharon Amity Road, Charlotte, NC 28215

North Carolina

Charlotte

7008 E Wt Harris Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28215

North Carolina

Charlotte

308 West Dixon Boulevard, Shelby, NC 28152

North Carolina

Shelby

302 E Franklin Boulevard, Gastonia, NC 28054

North Carolina

Gastonia

1129 Patton Avenue, Asheville, NC 28806

North Carolina

Asheville

901 N Marine Boulevard, Jacksonville, NC 28540

North Carolina

Jacksonville

5927 South Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28217

North Carolina

Charlotte

183 Crystal Circle, Mooresville, NC 28117

North Carolina

Mooresville

802 N Long Street, Salisbury, NC 28144

North Carolina

Salisbury


Frequently asked questions about bad credit loans in north carolina

  • Three years ago my father in law left my husband around 100 acres of prime property in his will. It is worth around 2.5 million. He has gotten us into debt for the 4th time in our marriage of almost 19 years. Totaling around 43,000 dollars. Everything from bad endeavors to credit card debt. I'm the one who has gotten us out of it, every time (even had my mother take out an extention loan on her home the last time). When the land was left to him he didn't follow through and have it put in our name. We still have no deed to the property. My question is this: If I do decide to divorce him (because I'm tired of bailing him out) is the land considered marital property because it was received during the course of a marriage? I live in the state of North Carolina.
  • You should really try to do some research online regarding property laws and divorce. Whoever was the executor of the will should have had a deed done putting the property in either his name, or both or your names. If you can't find any information, you may want to talk with a lawyer. The first consolation is almost always free and they should be able to tell you if you have any interest in the property.
  • The answer depends on how the devise to your husband was titled. Unless it was specifically devised to both you and your husband, it is assumed that the devise was meant to be just to your husband. In other words, unless you can prove that the devise was left specifically to both you and your husband, a NC court will consider the inheritance to be your husband's separate property...at least at the point that he received the land.
  • I purchased a car, was out of work due to a pregnancy and my bill fell behind. I paid on my car so they would not come take it if not the whole amout a partial payment was made. they came and took my car two weeks before Christmas with out a notification or anything. Now they are threatning to tag the remaining balance on a vehicle I have and are currenlty paying for or taking me to court. Is this legal??
  • If money is still owed to them (not covered by the repo) they can sue you for the remainding amount due. They cannot repo another car that is up-to-date on it's payments. That is illegal on their end. I would try to work out a re-payment plan with them for the amount owed. You would be better off taking money out of a credit card, borrowing from family or getting a loan than going to court. If they get a judgement against you for the amount owed this will be worse for your credit. As it is, a repo looks bad. You really should try to settle with them
  • They had the right to repossess the vehicle as soon as you were in default and they had accelerated the loan. Once they repossess it, they have to use reasonable means to get as much out of the car as possible, but if they do that and come up short on what they're owed, they absolutely have a right to sue you for the difference and get a deficiency judgment. Whether they have any other remedies depends on your contract with them.
  • I cant get any answers from legal aid, my landlord will not fix anything. There is no ac, no place to put the ac and its feels like 90 in the place. There are roaches, ants and spiders starting to come in since the weather warmed up. There is a hole in the ceiling in our bathroom. The toilet is leaking, the sink in the kitchen is leaking, there are no missing moldings on the front door. My landlord tried to connect the water to another place behind us and without notifying us left us with no water. He comes here hooking up extension cords without our permission and steals our electricity. I confronted him and he would not talk to me, he laughed and said we will figure something out when I asked him whos going to pay my power bill when the new people move in and uses up the water. So I am wanting to know if I move out, after only being here for 2 mths, what can he do. I didnt give him a deposit because he has not fixed anything. I am tired of my 4 kids crying because it is hot, none of the windows open to put in an window ac. We sleeping with insects and I cannot live her anymore especially when they are trying to be sneaky and steal from me and not do anything legally. So what will happen if I move out of my 1 yr lease. Can he take me court and if so what will happen? He owns the house, he is no one. This is not a rental agency, its private.
  • Well he cannot file an eviction since we have to live here for him to do so. He also cannot garnish my wages since in North Carolina is not a garnishment state. They only garnish for taxes and state taxes, student loans. Anything to do with federal or state fees. I dont care about my credit, I dont know legally in court what they can do since they do not garnish wages here for back rent. I cannot live somewhere when I am paying for trash.
  • Worst case scenerio is he sues you for the remainder of the lease term and is granted a wage garnishment for the judgment, so 25% of your income will go directly to him. Since he also gets 10% interest he can garnish your wages for years.
  • The the landlord can sue you for the remaining unpaid rent for the months left on your lease. There is no entity that forces you to pay a judgment but often judgments accrue interest and each month the judgment goes unpaid it adds up to 1% to the debt and this debt will never go away. The smarter thing to do would be to sue the landlord in small claims court for not providing a safe and healthy place to live, a big landlord no no and for his other breaches of contract. Only a judge can void a lease when all parties do not agree.
  • Let's see - you refused to give him a deposit and you have four crying kids. He would probably be happy to let you out of your lease! Seriously, some people are not worth your time to try and work with - you just need to sever the relationship. Tell him that it is apparent you each have very different expectations and that you will be leaving in 30 days. Document everything, leave the place clean, and he very likely won't take you to court. If he does, you will have documentation and photos to fight with. Good luck!
  • Call the local Building inspector and file a complaint. He will sue in court and win. You will owe all the rent plus court costs. You will have an eviction of your credit history and no other landlord will rent to you.
  • No, the IRS will not garnish that debt. They generally garnish government debt (back taxes, student loans, delinquent child support, etc.). The only other time they garnish a refund is if there is a court order to do so. Now, if you have that refund deposited into your bank account or cashed through that bank account, the bank will take the debt you owe them out of it. I would just pay it now, though. It might not seem important now, but in a few years you may want to purchase a home or apply for certain jobs or any number of things where bad credit can effect you in ways you do not realize right now.
  • No but once the refund hits your bank account, the bank can take the money.
  • Not at all
  • no
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