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State Michigan
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Loan amount limit $600
Loan terms Max: 31 days
Finance rates 15% of first $100, 14% of second $100, 13% of third $100, 12% of fourth $100, 11% of fifth $100, 11% of sixth $100 + any database verification fee
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9056 Telegraph Road, Taylor, MI 48180

Michigan

Taylor

11817 E 8 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48089

Michigan

Warren

885 E Apple Avenue, Muskegon, MI 49442

Michigan

Muskegon

913 S Saginaw Road, Midland, MI 48640

Michigan

Midland

5308 Highland Road, Waterford, MI 48327

Michigan

Waterford

6233 Division Avenue South, Grand Rapids, MI 49548

Michigan

Grand Rapids

2390 South Wayne Road, Westland, MI 48186

Michigan

Westland

5760 S Merriman Road, Wayne, MI 48184

Michigan

Wayne

457 Elizabeth Lake Road, Waterford, MI 48328

Michigan

Waterford

1422 S Main Street No. B, Adrian, MI 49221

Michigan

Adrian


Frequently asked questions about michigan money

  • I don't know about teenagers...but I live in MIchigan and the kids mowing lawns in my neighborhood just finished 2nd grade this year!
  • Sure, they do--some, anyway! My son is 13 and he does. You'll need to network and find one by word of mouth. It's hard for them to find transportation, but perhaps one of your co-workers has a teenager saving for something!
  • teenagers nowaday, all they want to do is sit in front of their computers, and play video games. good luck
  • only illegal mexican ones, the american teens are too busy playing on the computer or watching tv and getting fatter and fatter and dumber and dumber.
  • thale is a queer.....just cuz thats what you're fu*kin excuse is......
  • Looking at specifically in Paw Paw or areas nearby. Husband's families from there, and the area is beautiful. I wanted to buy homes while they were low, rent them out, then sell later....maybe. Should I? or Shouldn't I? Is it low because economy is at a deline and will continue? or Does real estate seem low, because I'm comparing it to where I live (Maui)?
  • When you buy real estate you are right to buy when the price is low. Prices in Michigan would seem low when compared to prices in Maui. You must understand prices change based on location. Ok? I advise you buy homes at a discount. This means buying homes for less than they're worth. A good deal can be found anywhere.
  • I am a real estate investor from Kalamazoo, and yes recently the property values have been on a decline( thank you Gov Granholm) but with the Kalamazoo Promise, people are starting to come back to the area. If you would like someone to work with you in this area, or anywhere in the lower peninsula, please call me at 616-821-5917. I would be more than happy to help you locate properties and whatever else you may need. Chris
  • Need a good Realtor? If In Alabama - e-mail me If not in Alabama - I can still recommend an experienced Realtor from your area that will give you OUTSTANDING service! I work with a network of Realtors across North Amercia. http://www.pauld-kw.com http://www.bhammls.com/dziedzic
  • A lot of people have been telling me that if you're like only 2% Native American in Michigan that you can get money in the mail every month... just wondering if that was true... cuz I'm like 6.25%, so is my brother, and my mom is 12.5 %.. so we were wondering if that was possible for us, because a lot of people have been telling us about it and saying we should see if we can do that. Thanks!
  • It does not matter what state you are from, but rather what tribe you are affiliated with. Many tribes were located in Michigan at some time including the Chippewa, Potawatomi, and Wyandot. To be eligible for any benefits including the $4.3 million Cobell settlement to Native Americans, you must be enrolled in a tribe. The process excruciatingly difficult. Indian tribes are sovereign and set their own rules regarding tribal enrollment and membership. Tribal governments all have different definitions of who is a tribal member. The criteria vary from a specific amount of blood quantum and linage to residency. The Cherokee Nation has no blood quantum at all. If you are unfamiliar with the process, or have trouble tracing your family tree, it's best to begin with the American Indian Registry. Although it's true that not all Indians get a check, some get an incredible amount annually. For example the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians take half of the income from their casinos and divide it among their members each year. For those below legal age, it is held in trust for them. It's true that people should not simply care about their heritage simply to get a check. This might be a good time for you to learn about your ancestors and help educate the other members of your family with what you learn. However, the fact that you are alive today means that you hold the DNA of those who suffered terrible hardship and cruelty for centuries. I am certain they would want you to take every cent you can get. They are not around to receive it, but if it were my grandchildren, I would want them to have it whether they knew of me or not. If you are unfamiliar with the process
  • Native American In Michigan
  • HI! Wondered if you followed through with this? The answer from Sarah--seems to be correct in my research. I am supposedly an eighth native american and know of a family who receives money every month from their tribe and the benefits don't end at any percentage. I have no idea what tribe I belong to yet but stumbled on this and thought I would ask. Hope this finds you well. ~K.
  • There's a difference between "claiming" Native ancestry (whatever percent you wanna throw out there) and HAVING legitimate Native ancestry. Most people in the latter category already are enrolled or at least have family with tribal affiliation...even if they are not themselves eligible for enrollment...these folks would recognize that they do not meet enrollment standards if that is the case, but can still be connected to native families and even be recognized by the community. I know of 1/8 and 1/16 BQ community members that are from a tribe that has 1/4 BQ requirement for example...they have CDIBs and even marry back into the tribe - and their 1/8 degree gets factored back into the kids BQ calculation..sometimes with the kids being eligible for enrollment while one of the parents is not (yes, Blood Quantum politics is crazy)... But the real issue here is how many Americans falsely or erroneosly claim to be "part" Indian...it is an epidemic. If your mom is an eighth then one of her parents or a grandparent HAD to have been enrolled. This is 2011 people...half bloods and even most quarter bloods in the last few generations are/were ENROLLED. Seriously. And FINALLY...THERE IS NO MONTH CHECK...NO BENNIES...(sorry my caps got stuck)...
  • You really need to find smarter people to talk to! The state of Michigan, just like every other state, does not hand out money to Natives, nor does the federal government. If Natives there receive ANYTHING, it comes from the tribe they are a member of and with your whopping 6.25% I doubt you would qualify to enroll in any Tribal Nation in the country.
  • So you claim your mom is an eighth and you are a sixteenth. These days an eighth is sometimes notable blood quantum, for my tribe this is the minimum blood quantum requirement for enrollment, but we have tribal members that are respected members of the community with lower quantums (they just cant be enrolled). But here is the thing, if your mom was really native american, she would be enrolled with a tribe already if their blood quantum requirements allow for it. REAL natives KNOW they are native, FOR SURE, and can ALWAYS back it up with legal documentation. Its kind of messed up if you think about it, that we are the ONLY race of people that legally HAS to prove who we are in order to get recognition, but in instances where people are told by a relative that "they have some indian blood in them" that cannot be proven, it comes in handy. It separates the liars or the misinformed from the real thing. As for the rumored "monthly check in the mail", it is nothing but a HUGE lie. Who started it? I have NO CLUE. but it has been circulating for generations and it is very annoying.
  • Money for what exactly? Contrary to popular belief, there is no monthly cheque from the government simply for being Native. There are certain bursaries, scholarships, housing grants, business loans and the like one can apply for via your Band, but you would have to be a registered member. These monies are not from the government, but come out of Band funds and therefore only go to qualified applicants. If you were actually Native, kept a relationship with your Native relatives, or were registered with a Nation, you would no these things.
  • a whole 6.25%? its a shame you had that nosebleed last month then. all your indian blood is gone. seriously people. stop with the crap about government checks. its a lie and you should know better. and trying to claim native blood because you think you will get money is shameful. i bet if we were still being rounded up to be herded somewhere on foot all you "part indians" would be very white indeed.
  • Where do I sign up? I wonder if you would be so quick to sign up if it cost you something. You have fallen for the myth of the govt check. There is no govt check, the govt does not subsidize us from cradle to grave, and there is also no free college. If there are any monies or educational grants available, they will come from the tribe you and your family are enrolled with, and those monies will come from the revenue of tribal business, or land leases, not the govt.
  • I don't know about Michigan, but I know as far as the Apaches in the Southwest, and the Nez Perce in the Northwest, you have to prove you're at least a quarter Native to qualify for any benefits.
  • Hello, Kathleen! The length of time until a refund is received depends on a lot of factors (paper or e-file, potential errors on the return, etc). If you e-filed your Michigan state return, the MI Treasury Dept recommends waiting at least 14 days before checking your status. If you paper-filed, they recommend allowing 6 WEEKS before checking. Regardless, the way to check your current refund status is to visit the website below or call the "Income Tax Refund Status/Telehelp" hotline at 800-827-4000. Good luck! :-)
  • Truthfully, it depends on how you file, and when you file. If you file early, usually you will get your federal the fastest, followed shortly by state. Later in the file-season, you may see state come before federal, but not by much. EXTREMELY late in the tax season, you'll get state, followed by federal a short while later (2-3 weeks later). This has been my experience in the past... which is why I now file early every year... =) However, if you want to get your filing expenses paid for this year, head to the below website!
  • When I lived in MI it didn't take too long. When i moved to another State however and still had to file MI taxes i waited for almost a year. You should be able to go to the State of MI website and check into the status of your return.
  • It depends on many factors
  • Ok, here is the scenario. This is both persons 2nd marriage. The husband has 6 children from the previous marriage and the wife has 2 children. They have no children together. After being married for 24 years the husband dies. Does everything automatically go to the wife. Are his children entitled to anything? What if they had a will? Would wife be entitled to everything still? I am looking for the legal point of view. Thanks
  • If the will leaves everything to the wife, then she gets everything. Many married couples assume that each spouse's individually owned property will automatically belong to the surviving spouse if either of them dies without a Will. Although this is generally true, if the deceased spouse has any children by someone other than the surviving spouse, the surviving spouse may receive as little as the first $126,000 and one-half of any remaining property. In fact, this also applies if the deceased spouse does not have any living children, but has any grandchildren by deceased children from a former relationship. Michigan Intestacy Laws 700.2101 Intestate estate. (1) Any part of a decedent's estate not effectively disposed of by will passes by intestate succession to the decedent's heirs as prescribed in this act, except as modified by the decedent's will. (2) A decedent by will may expressly exclude or limit the right of an individual or class to succeed to property of the decedent that passes by intestate succession. If that individual or a member of that class survives the decedent, the share of the decedent's intestate estate to which that individual or class would have succeeded passes as if that individual or each member of that class had disclaimed his or her intestate share. 700.2102 Share of spouse. (1) The intestate share of a decedent's surviving spouse is 1 of the following: (a) The entire intestate estate if no descendant or parent of the decedent survives the decedent. (b) The first $150,000.00, plus 1/2 of any balance of the intestate estate, if all of the decedent's surviving descendants are also descendants of the surviving spouse and there is no other descendant of the surviving spouse who survives the decedent. (c) The first $150,000.00, plus 3/4 of any balance of the intestate estate, if no descendant of the decedent survives the decedent, but a parent of the decedent survives the decedent. (d) The first $150,000.00, plus 1/2 of any balance of the intestate estate, if all of the decedent's surviving descendants are also descendants of the surviving spouse and the surviving spouse has 1 or more surviving descendants who are not descendants of the decedent. (e) The first $150,000.00, plus 1/2 of any balance of the intestate estate, if 1 or more, but not all, of the decedent's surviving descendants are not descendants of the surviving spouse. (f) The first $100,000.00, plus 1/2 of any balance of the intestate estate, if none of the decedent's surviving descendants are descendants of the surviving spouse. (2) Each dollar amount listed in subsection (1) shall be adjusted as provided in section 1210. (See the current spouse's share amount here) 700.2103 Share of heirs other than surviving spouse. Any part of the intestate estate that does not pass to the decedent's surviving spouse under section 2102, or the entire intestate estate if there is no surviving spouse, passes in the following order to the following individuals who survive the decedent: (a) The decedent's descendants by representation. (b) If there is no surviving descendant, the decedent's parents equally if both survive or to the surviving parent. (c) If there is no surviving descendant or parent, the descendants of the decedent's parents or of either of them by representation. (d) If there is no surviving descendant, parent, or descendant of a parent, but the decedent is survived by 1 or more grandparents or descendants of grandparents, 1/2 of the estate passes to the decedent's paternal grandparents equally if both survive, or to the surviving paternal grandparent, or to the descendants of the decedent's paternal grandparents or either of them if both are deceased, the descendants taking by representation; and the other 1/2 passes to the decedent's maternal relatives in the same manner. If there is no surviving grandparent or descendant of a grandparent on either the paternal or the maternal side, the entire estate passes to the decedent's relatives on the other side in the same manner as the 1/2. 700.2105 No taker; effect. If there is no taker under the provisions of this article, the intestate estate passes to this state. 700.2106 Representation. (1) If, under section 2103(a), a decedent's intestate estate or a part of the estate passes by representation to the decedent's descendants, the estate or part of the estate is divided into as many equal shares as the total of the surviving descendants in the generation nearest to the decedent that contains 1 or more surviving descendants and the deceased descendants in the same generation who left surviving descendants, if any. Each surviving descendant in the nearest generation is allocated 1 share. The remaining shares, if any, are combined and then divided in the same manner among the surviving descendants of the deceased descendants as if the surviving descendants who were allocated a share and their surviving descendants had predeceased the decedent. (2) If, under section 2103(c) or (d), a decedent's intestate estate or a part of the estate passes by representation to the descendants of the decedent's deceased parents or either of them or to the descendants of the decedent's deceased paternal or maternal grandparents or either of them, the estate or part of the estate is divided into as many equal shares as the total of the surviving descendants in the generation nearest the deceased parents or either of them, or the deceased grandparents or either of them, that contains 1 or more surviving descendants and the deceased descendants in the same generation who left surviving descendants, if any. Each surviving descendant in the nearest generation is allocated 1 share. The remaining shares, if any, are combined and then divided in the same manner among the surviving descendants of the deceased descendants as if the surviving descendants who were allocated a share and their surviving descendants had predeceased the decedent. (3) As used in this section: (a) “Deceased descendant”, “deceased parent”, or “deceased grandparent” means a descendant, parent, or grandparent who either predeceased the decedent or is considered to have predeceased the decedent under section 2104. (b) “Surviving descendant” means a descendant who neither predeceased the decedent nor is considered to have predeceased the decedent under section 2104. 700.2107 Relative of half blood. A relative of the half blood inherits the same share he or she would inherit if he or she were of the whole blood. There is no statute granting the surviving spouse the right to take an elective share. The surviving spouse that is omitted from the deceased's will is entitled to the share they would be granted if the deceased had died intestate, unless it appears that the omission was intentional, or the surviving spouse was otherwise provided for. Mich. Comp. Laws Ann §700.126. (West 1995).
  • Intestate: First $150,000 to the wife and the balance between the wife and kids. Testate: with some exceptions, the will controls. If there is real estate involved, you will need a lawyer.
  • If there's a legitimate Will, it finalizes everything. If not, theres a formula that is followed, leaving everybody a bit of everything, mostly to the wife.
  • it somewhat is an tremendously life like question. A majority of human beings i know % to be buried next to significant different #a million. it would desire to might desire to do with undemanding issues like having already offered a joint headstone, or it somewhat is the kinfolk plot. it would additionally might desire to do with the "old flame" element. enable's settle for it, you does not be married to significant different #2 if #a million had not died.
  • His children should (and will) come first, the wife second. I have seen the wills being overturned.
  • Wife, but don't kill him, you love him, don't you?
  • It depends on exactly what you mean by "education". Michigan spends LOTS of money on education, but most of the funds go to teacher's salaries (including health care) and teacher retirement. The unions (not just the teacher's union) have been a huge factor in the demise of Michigan's economy.
  • You need to ask this in the Amusement Parks category. You are able to manually choose a category on Yahoo; they merely "suggest" categories, but you can choose your own. You should re-ask this in a different category. Either that, or get a new map. Michigan's Adventure is about 19 hours away from Orlando, Florida. 1282.6 miles away to be precise. This is the Orlando, Florida travel category.
  • Any major bank will exchange a foreign currency! You can basically change that money into any currency in the world so long that the bank you change it at is big enough to look like it has the currency you're looking for!
  • A great Part Time & Full Time Job at home for Teens is doing Free Surveys Online. Its simple, easy and for ages 13 and up. An easy way for teens to make extra money. check this website for more info and Proof of Payments http://bestearningways.com Thanks http://answers.yahoo.com
  • Michigan property taxes http://www.michigan.gov/taxes/0,1607,7-2... Ad Valorem Property Tax Levy Reports You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader installed to view the reports listed below. http://www.michigan.gov/taxes/0,4676,7-2... Hope that you find the above enclosed information useful. 10/31/2012
  • Property taxes go to the individual city, town, or county, not to the state.
  • Actually it would be plasma rather than whole blood. It's a lengthier procedure. Here is a website that I just quickly scanned but it may be of help to you. http://www.ehow.com/how_4791708_plasma-m... -------------------------------------- Also, this place has 3 locations in Michigan listed. http://www.talecrisplasma.com/ --------------------------------------... These people have 5 locations http://www.biolifeplasma.com/html/center... --------------------------------------... http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/1991524/biolife_plasma_donation_centers_of.html?cat=5
  • Plasma Donation Michigan
  • This Site Might Help You. RE: Where do you donate blood for money in michigan? ????
  • For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/awOs0 none its called donating (to present as a gift, grant, or contribution; make a donation of, as to a fund or cause) But you could find a place and sell your plasma but you can't sell blood. Someone told me they got $50 for one session
  • Since you live in Michigan, then it's Bovada (http://www.sportsbook-ratings.net/Bovada... or Intertops (http://www.sportsbook-ratings.net/Intert... They have the best platforms and easiest deposit / payout methods. For Bovada, be sure to use the MyPaylinQ method, which works just like PayPal and you get your payouts the same way. Don't use the check option, as it may take 4 weeks :P Intertops offers free bankwire payouts once per month!
  • Merge network, Cake network, Bovada edit -- nevermind about Everleaf
  • None.
  • Granholm and DeVos have each spent $50MILLION on ad campaigns. More spending is expected up until election day. Don't you think Michigan (particularly Mid-Michigan) could have used that money? Think: Bay City and Saginaw are short on law enforcement personnel. (Can you name more cities in Mid-Mich?) Flint is top-5 most dangerous cities in America --- of any size population. This is sick.
  • What better way to spend money the to disc the other guy. Each of them do more advertisement for the other then they do for themselves. Devos has spent 16 million of his own money, pleasures of being a billionaire I guess. 16 million would feed a lot of the hungry or build a bunch of shelters for the homeless, and like you said provide cops where they are needed. I think Devos has his eyes set on the presidency, that is why he is slamming Granholm so hard, he has run a pretty dirty campaign so far, the last week ought to be a doozy.
  • No question that the ad campaign money could have been better spent. But here's the problem: Let's say Dick DeVos had decided to cut his campaign budget in half and donate $8 million to help law enforcement efforts in the tri-city area -- do you honestly think that $8 million would be used for its intended purpose? The police in Flint, Saginaw, and Bay City would be lucky if they saw $1 million of that, and you can chalk that up to government bureauocracy. And why is nobody doing the math and seeing that Granholm and the Democratic National Committee have spent OVER TWICE AS MUCH on her re-election campaign than DeVos has spent on his? Sorry folks, but DeVos is right -- it's time for a change. Jennifer Granholm is a politician through-and-through, and the last thing we need in Lansing right now is another politician. Go ahead and bash him for supposedly supporting the outsourcing of jobs if it makes you feel better, but the results he has produced in Grand Rapids are tough to argue with (especially when you compare that to Granholm's lack of results during her tenure as Governor).
  • You are the second person i have heard say anything about it. (my grandma was first). These assholes should spend money on the state they are running for governer for. The senate people too. That's why my family doesn't vote because we don't like any of them. And i can name more places in michigan that are ****** too. Portland is getting more gangs by the minute, and detroit has the second most crime in the U.S.A.
  • schools, maybe. creating jobs....i can think of a few uses for $50 million besides campaining. Granholm needs to be fired, though. The state has gone to sh*t on her watch. Vote her out, people!
  • What Saginaw needs is for the police that are here to patrol around the areas that HAS all the gang violence.
  • It's without question that they could be using the money for more important reasons. But they don't care, they just want to get voted in. "Forget the people, just vote for me" is their mentality, and at this rate, that mentality can only get worse.
  • YES it could have been spent on better things. but campaign spending is biased on the system not the candidate. no money no voice. .
  • Well, there are 2 possibilities. 1. He could become a deer processor (up to 80 $ for de boning & cutting up a deer) or 2. He could get into taxidermy. both of those activites bring in decent money during the deer season.
  • His best bet would be to find a hunting-related job, like a salesperson at Outdoor World or something like that. Sponsored hunting gigs are one-in-a-million and usually given to people already within the industry.
  • If he is talented, he could find a sponsor and become a Pro-staffer for one of the Sporting Goods or Major Firearms companies,making Hunting Video's or Cable Hunting Shows etc (After all wouldn't we ALL like to hunt and get paid to do it?) but it is a highly competetive business and the positions are much sought after. It would take a bit of time to accomplish too, so your brother would have to support himself meanwhile.......
  • He could shoot nice bucks and sell the head/antlers to people from Chicago. Or he could learn to make chandeliers and knife handles form the antlers and sell those. By the time he mastered this art, however, he probably could have found another job.
  • If you can sell the deer for several hundred $$ you may break even. This question is absurd. You are kidding, right?
  • He could be a guide/outfitter.
  • you could sell the meat on a market stall ??
  • there is NO possible way!!!
  • NO.*
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