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State Michigan
Legal status
Allowed (Our partner lenders provide payments in Michigan)
Loan amount limit $600
Loan terms Max: 31 days
Finance rates 15% of first $100, 14% of second $100, 13% of third $100, 12% of fourth $100, 11% of fifth $100, 11% of sixth $100 + any database verification fee
Finance charges $15
Maximum APR (Annual percentage rate) 390%

9056 Telegraph Road, Taylor, MI 48180

Michigan

Taylor

11817 E 8 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48089

Michigan

Warren

885 E Apple Avenue, Muskegon, MI 49442

Michigan

Muskegon

913 S Saginaw Road, Midland, MI 48640

Michigan

Midland

5308 Highland Road, Waterford, MI 48327

Michigan

Waterford

6233 Division Avenue South, Grand Rapids, MI 49548

Michigan

Grand Rapids

2390 South Wayne Road, Westland, MI 48186

Michigan

Westland

5760 S Merriman Road, Wayne, MI 48184

Michigan

Wayne

457 Elizabeth Lake Road, Waterford, MI 48328

Michigan

Waterford

1422 S Main Street No. B, Adrian, MI 49221

Michigan

Adrian


Frequently asked questions about michigan lenders

  • Greetings Sunny, Your question is a bit vague but I'm assuming something fell through on the home and now the lender is angry? I am not a banker and have never worked for a bank but I do believe that they can come after you, even though your name is not on anything. As her husband, you are considered 50% of her, from a legal perspective. So if they cannot gain anything from her I believe they would be able to pursue you. Again, I am not a banker, so this is just speculation. On the other hand. If there are problems with the home's payments, you do have options. If the home is in preforeclosure, you may be able to negotiate a short sale with the lender and a real estate investor(THIS I am). In this case you can be rid of the home without any further damage done to your credit. Or her's I should say. If the home has entered foreclosure all ready you still have options, though with less manueverability on your end. Either way, I would contact a real estate investor(ahem) and give them all the details you can on the home in question. They will be able to tell you what can and cannot be done here. Hope this helped, Christopher
  • My spouse purchased a home in Michigan before we met/married so I am not on the mortgage or the deed. We rented the house for about a year but have not had success renting it again. We listed the house for sale and are currently working with a Realtor on a short-sale. Her lender has started the foreclosure process, even though they have had a short-sale offer on the table for the past 5 months. After we met (but before we married) I also purchased a home in Michigan. I purchased the home on my own credit and I am the only person on the mortgage. My spouse did "gift" me a small sum of money for the down-payment, but her name is not on the deed or the mortgage. As I understand it, her lender cannot come after my assets or my credit if her house does end up being foreclosed on. Is this true even with the fact that she gifted me a small amount of money for the down-payment? Additionally, it gets confusing to me when I start hearing about joint assets due to marriage. What can her lender consider joint assets and go after? If I leave her name off my bank accounts, etc, will that protect me from any future judgements? If I do buy another house in the future, even if I do it completely in my name, can this be considered joint assets that her lender can go after (since we are now married)? Is there a period of time where her lender can no-longer sue for money that they do not fully reclaim for a foreclosure sale? Are there any steps I need to take to make sure I am protected? Thank you
  • Michigan isn't a community property state, You are correct, you aren't responsible for your wife's debt, nor can her creditors take your assets, As far as her gifting you money? That should be a non issue, unless she were to file bankruptcy in that case, the asset transfer look back rule would be in play,,,
  • i think of this is going to. this is hard to split the credit of couple residing collectively. certainly, you do no longer even would desire to be married as a manner to have shared credit background -- having a selection of of shared credit money owed and that could do the trick. After that, this is stressful to split credit information -- even after a separation of the relationship. So, in case you have the different shared money owed, then however occurs interior the destiny to a minimum of one will influence the different.
  • I am a first time home buyer, i make between 50 and 60K a year and my wife makes about 20k part time. I wasnt planning on buying for about a year but we came across a great deal on a house from a retiring relocating couple asking 124k. The mortgage companies i have contacted all want 5% down 7% intrest (about 6k for down payment and 3k+ for closing). I can swing the down payment with cash i have on hand but i dont think i can come up with the extra 3k+ for closing for a couple months. We really dont want to lose this house we can easily afford the payments of about $1050 a month. Is there any way we can work with the sellers to cover costs or roll the costs into the mortgage does anyone know a broker who can do that in michigan
  • Make your offer contigent on the sellers paying your closing costs. Most mortgages will allow up to 3% sellers contribution to a mortgage, but some won't allow any. Check with your lender to make sure this contribution is permitted. If you don't have a lender yet, ask friends and family for recommendations for lenders in your area. Local lenders will know of local programs you can qualify for, and there are undoubtedly some good ones out there in Michigan. Edit: OK, I'll give you the benefit of the doubt that you are responsible and at least a half way intelligent person. =) The reason I suggested a mortgage broker is that they often deal with multitudes of plans. Credit unions and such only deal with what plans they have in house, typically only a few. If you are concerned about closing costs and such, get a good faith estimate of closing costs before you sign up. Then if you are comparing various lenders, you can compare apples to apples. 7% interest rate isn't great, I think you can do better unless your credit is mediocre. What 6% sellers contribution means is that the seller can contribute up to 6% of your closing costs, which should cover the vast majority, if not all. This comes off your sellers bottom line. Say the asking price is $124,000. You offer $115,000, plus the seller to contribute up to 6% of the closing costs. You have essentially offered $108,100, because the seller will anticipate paying $6,900 of your closing costs. HTH! Good luck!
  • You do not need a mortgage company. Try a credit union, they give great rates and less in closing costs. A bank would be a second choice, same as the credit union, but could cost a little more. Typically mortgage companies are for people that cant get financing at a bank or credit union. Mortgage companies make a lot of money on your mortgage where a credit union is owned by its members. They make it a service for its members, and therefore dont charge all the fees a mortgage has to charge. If your credit is good, there is no reason you cant get financed at a credit union. Even if you dont have an account at a credit union, you can always open an account once you know if you qualify for a mortgage with them. In the purchase agreeement ask for the seller to pay all closing costs if that is holding you from buying the house. I am a broker in Michigan but sounds like you have all worked out except your financing. A seller pays for a broker so they probably wouldnt want to pay the cost of a broker. You can email me back if more questions.
  • While you could ask the sellers to kick in money, wouldn't be feel better to wait a year and save the necessary funds that you need? Are you sure the interest rate is a "fixed" rate? Make sure. There are several other associated fee's that you probably aren't aware of. I suggest you know what and how much those are, like house insurance, appraisal, etc. And are you planning to have an inspection done? $375+. If not, you should. The cost of a new furnace could be as much as $2500. A number of years back a family lost their children to carbon monoxide, because they didn't have an inspection. Write the offer "contingent" upon the inspection. That way if anything is seriously wrong with the house, and the sellers won't pay to fix it, you can walk away. You probably should have used a Realtor to help you with all of these things. Especially if the seller is willing to pay their commission instead of you.
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