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State Massachusetts
Legal status 🚫
Prohibited

110 Atlantic Ave, Boston, MA 02110

Massachusetts

Boston

287 Pleasant Street, Northampton, MA 01060

Massachusetts

Northampton

392 South Broadway, Lawrence, MA 01843

Massachusetts

Lawrence

130 W Boylston Street, Worcester, MA 01606

Massachusetts

Worcester

50 Washington Avenue, Chelsea, MA 02150

Massachusetts

Chelsea

1 Roundhouse Plaza, Northampton, MA 01060

Massachusetts

Northampton

113 Mount Auburn Street, Watertown, MA 02472

Massachusetts

Watertown

50 Washington Avenue, Chelsea, MA 02150

Massachusetts

Chelsea

386 Walnut Street Extension, Agawam, MA 01001

Massachusetts

Agawam

2 South Street No. 120, Pittsfield, MA 01201

Massachusetts

Pittsfield


Frequently asked questions about cash loan massachusetts

  • Yes, you can buy a car, assuming you pay with cash because you can't get a loan not being 18 years old. However, you're not old enough to buy insurance, which means you can't register the car, which means you can't drive it. The best thing to do is have the ownership (title) in both your name and the name of one of your parents. That parent can then buy insurance or add you and the car to their own insurance, and then register in their name.
  • You can be the owner of property at any age, Oliwer, include that of a motor vehicle. However, Mass law stipulates that you must be of legal age before you would be eligible to insure and register the vehicle. That's where you parents would have to step in.
  • As a minor you are never the owner of a car. You may co-own with a parent. Legally even your pay check belongs to them. Minors can not enter contract, may not purchase vehicles, insurance, etc.
  • Best possible case is you are a co-owner but you need an adult too. They would have to register it, buy a tag, buy insurance and so forth. Doesnt have to be your parents but it usually is.
  • You if you are paying the total amount . https://www.google.ca/webhp?sourceid=chr...
  • You need create a contract of a bill of sale and have both parties sign it. You would do that at a bank so I could have it notarized to make the contract more official. You then need to buy the vehicle with an official bank check, not cash. Keep the check stub as another form of proof of purchase. Last you need to get the title and you both need to sign that too. If they do not have a title do not buy the vehicle unless they are still paying off a vehicle loan. If that is the case then you need to keep the vehicle and the keys at your home until the original owner gets the title. It takes a while to get it. Make sure they can prove that they will pay of their loan and it will be paid in full.
  • In MA, you have 7 days to have the car inspected and if it fails, you can request your money back.
  • I am wondering should I buy or rent?? My husband and I are paying 1100 each month for rent right now. In addition, we pay 1300 a month for student loan. Very soon our student loan will be paid off and we will start to have extra money every month. We have about 10% down save up for a 200K house. We are wondering, if it is worthy to buy than? By the way, we are in Massachusetts. So...property tax is not extremely low (approx. $4000/yr) and we will have to commute (can't afford to buy in the city)
  • Although housing prices are expected to drop a little more, and gas prices are expected to go up, first see what the difference in expenses will be. Set up an excel spreadsheet if you do not have Microsoft Office, go to openoffice.org and download Open Office it is basically the same but free. Do an income vs expense report on what you are paying now, then a second on what you would be paying, (take off the student loan for the now because it is almost paid off) For the Home do not forget insurance, taxes upkeep and additional mileage on the cars See where you stand on your outlay of cash, then make a decision
  • Sure, but owning a home also costs money in taxes, repairs and upkeep. Suze Orman, a financial expert says that owning a home is actually 40% more than renting. Because if you have to replace the roof, or buy garden hoses and a lawnmower, the costs add up. Try to save for a couple months longer, than do it.
  • I'm getting divorced in Massachusetts and my wife has only worked part-time since we have had our daughter 10 years ago. At the time, we both worked full time and decided that rather than put her into day care, we would have my wife work p/t, her mother take our daughter for the p/t hours, and now our daughter is in school and my wife works school bus hours, i.e., puts her on the bus, then is home awaiting the bus. She makes a good salary for her job part time, and if she went full time would be near mine. My question is not at all about child support, just alimony. I would have no interest in the new car we paid cash for, the furniture, etc., I'm just worried that after child care, alimony, school loans and a few other debts, I will have zero left to live. Thank you.
  • You really need to contact a lawyer licensed in the state of Mass, but in the state of Colorado...alimony isn't a requirement. If the court finds your wife able to support herself in all ways, he will not advice alimony. If your wife gains full custody of your daughter, it's a 98% chance you'll be ordered to pay child support. In most cases, I'd say 80% of divorce cases, if the wife hasn't been working during the marriage or needs to go back to school, alimony is ordered. I would make it especially clear to either your lawyer or judge, that her income would be in the income category of yours if she became full time. The judge could very well order your wife to go full time in the settlement. Decisions you make during your divorce will affect your life and the life of your children for many years so always make your voice heard. In my experience, negotiated settlements are often best for people over the long-term. You must also know that fighting for your best interests is key. Good luck.
  • Good idea on not leaving the house. Alimony is NOT a requirement. I live in PA, and even though we were married over ten years and have a son, I got no alimony. However.....there IS something called APL, or "alimony pende lite." It is an alimony (spousal support) payment she can get after the paperwork is filed, up until the divorce ends. This is supposedly to help keep everyone "able" to afford the divorce. This is in addition to the child support. BUT.....it ends when the divorce is finalized. Point #1. FOR HER: All APL payments made to her, she will need to claim as income on her tax return and pay taxes. FOR YOU: All APL payments you make to her can be deducted from your income when you file taxes. Point #2. If her APL and child support payments are "unallocated," meaning there is a lump sum and no written amount listed as to how much is APL and how much is child support, the entire amount is taxable income to her, and deductable to you. This is bad news for her and good news for you, since child support payments are not taxable to her or deductable to you. In addition, it is good she is working, even part time. She has less of a claim for alimony, since you can establish that she already has income capability and is not in need of job training, etc....
  • alimony is only for when the ex wife is incapable of giving herself the same income as you to provide the same lifestyle as before so from what you say it shouldn't be but it will depend on the judge and who has the best lawyer
  • custody is key. whoever gets custody will get payments from the other partner. you can help your case by filing for divorce first and being the "plaintiff."
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