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State Kansas
Legal status
Allowed (Our partner lenders provide payments in Kansas)
Loan amount limit $500
Loan terms 7-30 days
Finance rates 15% of loan
Finance charges $15
Maximum APR (Annual percentage rate) 390%

7637 Metcalf Avenue, Overland Park, KS 66204

Kansas

Overland Park

2910 Se California Avenue, Topeka, KS 66605

Kansas

Topeka

1113 E Santa Fe Street, Olathe, KS 66061

Kansas

Olathe

133 E 3rd Street, Newton, KS 67114

Kansas

Newton

3015 S 4th Street, Leavenworth, KS 66048

Kansas

Leavenworth

1019 Washington Road, Newton, KS 67114

Kansas

Newton

4625 Shawnee Drive, Kansas City, KS 66106

Kansas

Kansas City

3375 E 47th Street South, Wichita, KS 67216

Kansas

Wichita

4007 Parkview Drive, Pittsburg, KS 66762

Kansas

Pittsburg

2205 S 4th Street, Leavenworth, KS 66048

Kansas

Leavenworth


Frequently asked questions about best cash advance in Kansas

  • The Great Depression and I were born the same year--1929! I lived in Kansas in a little town, and I think that we fared better than most people in the cities. My Dad always rented a house with lots of room to make our vegetable gardens; to raise a goat, and some chickens. I got a lot of goat's milk, as it was very nutritious, as I was sick a lot. Most of the vacinations weren't developed until during WWII. Goats milk was better for me than a cow's milk, so Dad got a nanny goat that had to be milked daily. I never got the "hang" of that, though. There were very few jobs for men, but my Father did get a job at a plant nursery. He was very good at propagating sp? GROWING PLANTS. We always had our own vegetable garden; had a nanny goat (whose milk was very nutritious) and I didn't taste cow's milk until I was grown. I caught a lot of childhood diseases--as prevention wasn't that far advanced--pneumonia, chicken pox, measles, whooping cough, etc. Polio was active and I remember Stanley, a classmate, who caught it. He lived through it (while many others died of it), but it left him permanently crippled. He was able to walk a little with crutches---but he died a few years later. We kids all knew that it was the polio that really killed him.--- The country wasn't very advanced agriculturally then, and when farmers plowed their fields, a lot of the good, nutritious top soil was blown away in those fierce dry winds. Farmers finally learned to contour their plowing that prevented a lot of top soil loss. Those dry winds were so strong, that it was difficult to keep the fine dust out of the house. Mom used to keep wet tea towels hanging at the windows to catch the fine dust.-- To make farming worse, those were very very DRY YEARS! I remember as a little kid, when Mom had to hang wet tea towels at our windows to catch the fine dust that blew through the cracks! The summers were very, very hot--and back then there was no such thing as air conditioning! Dad would bring in big blocks of ice; Mom would hang a wet tea towel behind it and place a fan blowing over the ice to cool the air behind it. Re the relatively little cash available stemmed (I think) from the fact that the Treasury Department printed money that far exceeded the gold reserves that were supposed to back up the paper money. So the country ended up with a lot of worthless paper money. I remember that people traded goods with each other--and tried to by-pass the stores and the high mark-up prices. My Dad always rented a house with a big back yard, where we would plant big vegetable gardens, and then store the excess food deep in caves to keep for the winter. Our one fruit came from an old apple tree--that didn't belong to anyone, but was a "stray" by the side of the road. We kids would pick as much as we could and then Mom would store the excess friuit in the dark, cooler cellar. ---I'm 85 yrs old now, and I've forgotten a lot of it...but I do remember the worry on my parents' faces! ---It was a great shame, but it really was the Japanese that took Americans out of the Depression--by their attack on Pearl Harbor ---(in l941 ??? I can't remember.) Men joined the military services and women--for the first time in history--took their places in the work field. I remember that "Rosie the Riveter" was the symbol of that movement of women into the work places. Wages were good--but it was a shame that it took a terrible world war to do it!
  • It was the effect of the Wall Street crash in America during 1929 and into the 30s. The crash caused banks to close and jobs to be lost. Thus causing a depression in American society. 13/14 million were unemployed.
  • it's on Google we cannot do it justice in a few words on here it may be a little too late now but finance should have studied this more as well we wouldn't be in such a precarious position now it was a dreadful time wars are bad but you can fight against something at least but that was worse
  • It's not a happy story. Google it.
  • It was greatly depressing.
  • Google it
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