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State Georgia
Legal status đźš«
Prohibited

1750 Marietta Highway, Canton, GA 30114

Georgia

Canton

1166 Franklin Road SE No. 9, Marietta, GA 30067

Georgia

Marietta

478 North Avenue, Athens, GA 30601

Georgia

Athens

310 Maple Street, Carrollton, GA 30117

Georgia

Carrollton

6135 Roswell Road Northeast, Atlanta, GA 30328

Georgia

Atlanta

6199 Highway 92, Acworth, GA 30102

Georgia

Acworth

1544 Tara Road, Jonesboro, GA 30238

Georgia

Jonesboro

1101 E Montgomery Xrd, Savannah, GA 31406

Georgia

Savannah

2141 W Broad Street No. Centre, Athens, GA 30606

Georgia

Athens

1015 Alpharetta Street, Roswell, GA 30075

Georgia

Roswell


Frequently asked questions about online loans available in georgia

  • The card doesn't need to have a high balance. I probably will be paying small in small payments for food, bills etc. I have a debit card and a job and I will be paying back the credit card bill almost immediately probably the same day because I'm OCD like that. I just want a credit card without fees and no tricks. Any suggestions? BTW, I'm 21 and I live in Georgia and I bank with Bank of America if that helps
  • Contrary to what a lot of people think, student credit cards can be quite easy to get IF you're a full-time college student AND they can be a good way to build credit. If you're a full-time college student, the laws are entirely different for you. You don't need a co-signer even if you're under 21 and you don't need to make much money. Basically, you have to be able to make the minimum payment. My daughter has a student Discover card and loves it. If you use her referral link here: https://www.discovercard.com/cardmembers... you'll get $50 cashback bonus when you make your first purchase and you'll get cashback bonuses for everything that you purchase. There's no annual fee and the APR (annual percentage rate) is fairly good. It ranges from 12.99 to 19.99%. But, it really doesn't matter how much the APR is if you pay your balance in full each month. As long as you pay in full, you'll never pay interest. If you use a credit card wisely, it can be a great tool. But, you can also ruin your credit, so whichever card you end up getting, just be certain to use it the right way. Use it for convenience (paying at the pump, making reservations online, etc.) and to build credit. Don't use it to buy something that you can't afford. Use it at least once a month for something that you need to buy anyway (gas, food, etc.). Set that money aside immediately so that you have the full amount when the statement arrives. Don't pay before the statement arrives. Or, at least don't pay all of it. You don't want a zero balance when your cycle ends. You do want to keep your utilization at (or below) 30% of your available balance. In other words, if you have a $1,000 limit, you should never have more than $300 in use at any one time. Just don't let temptation to get to you. It's too easy to spend money that you don't have. Be smart, and a credit card can be a wonderful tool.
  • While it is true that you don't need a credit card to build creditworthiness, it is the easiest way to start building your credit. Despite Dave Ramesy and those who drink his kool aid, credit cards are not evil. They are tools and if used properly are very useful. Since you have no credit history, you might have to start with a secured card. Check with BOA. You have a relationship with them and they are more likely to extend credit to you. When you get the card, use it for regular purchases, WAIT FOR THE STATEMENT, and pay the balance in full every month. That will build your credit and avoid interest. DO NOT pay immediately. Card companies don't want multiple payments and it defeats the purpose of building credit. Cards only report to the credit bureaus once a month. If you pay immediately, you won't show any utilization on the card. You have to show utilization to build credit.
  • Anyone that tells you you need a credit card to build "creditworthiness" is lying to you. Why would you need credit if you can pay your bills anyway? DON"T FALL INTO THE TRAP! Your debit card and job, plus the money you have in your account and LACK of debt will get you further in life than a credit card ever will. Read Dave Ramsey's "Total Money Makeover". It explains the whole credit scam in pretty simple terms.
  • I graduated in December 2010 with my Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice with a business minor. My plan was to go into corporate law, but during my last two semesters of my undergrad, I started thinking about whether or not law school was really for me. After thinking for some time, I decided to pursue my Masters in Healthcare Administration. I have applied to the University of Phoenix but I am also open to other programs in Savannah, GA or other accredited online programs. My other dilemma is whether it would be beneficial for me to get a second bachelors in health care administration and then go into the masters program or just pursue my masters. I am not sure if there is a monetary difference in having your bachelors in health care administration or the MHA. Another bit of information, I currently work at one of the colleges in Savannah, I am a full time staff member, and beginning in the summer, the state/university would pay for my classes. So there lies the question of would it be smarter to have my tuition paid for or just use student loans? I am also torn between attending the University of Phoenix or going to a traditional 4 year school. I know what I want to do in life, I just don't know the proper direction I should take. Any help would be greatly appreciated. -Confused yet driven...
  • Well, you have a few things going on here. First, I would choose the MHA Degree rather than a second bachelor's degree in healthcare administration. Most MHA graduates do not have an undergraduate background in one specific area or another. So in my opinion, the undergraduate curriculum does not matter. Second, since the school will be paying for your degree, I understand why you are looking at an online program. Online programs are great, but make sure you do your research. With an MHA, the school does matter. University of Phoenix would not be bad if you already had been working in healthcare, however if not then you need to look at the best online schools. Here is a list of great online MHA programs. Penn State: http://mhaguide.com/mha-pennsylvania/penn-state-university-mha/ Ohio University: http://mhaguide.com/mha-ohio/ohio-university-mha/ University of Cincinnati: http://mhaguide.com/mha-ohio/university-of-cincinnati-mha/ George Washington MBA in Healthcare: http://mhaguide.com/mha-virginia/george-washington-university-mha-mba/ However, since you are in Savannah, you might have some nearby options for residential programs. Armstrong Atlantic: http://mhaguide.com/mha-georgia/armstrong-atlantic-state-mha/ Georgia Southern: http://mhaguide.com/mha-georgia/georgia-southern-mha/ Medical Univ. SC: http://mhaguide.com/mha-south-carolina/medical-university-sc-mha/ A bit farther but evening and weekend classes might be an option. I will say this, online and residential programs are very different. In the residential format, you will meet many other people who can connect you in the industry whether they are students, professors, or guest speakers. However, online programs are very flexible and arguably there are better (ranking wise) online programs that are available rather than the programs in your area. I hope this helps as I had to go through almost the exact same situation two years ago!
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  • If I were you, I would pursue a Master’s degree in Healthcare Administration rather than a Bachelor’s. If the eligibility criterion for an MHA is a Bachelor’s degree, then why would you even consider getting another Bachelor’s? Just go with a Master’s in Healthcare Administration. An MHA is, in fact, the standard credential for healthcare administration jobs. With a Bachelor’s, you can at best hope to get entry-level or assistant positions and work your way up from there. Compensation would obviously be commensurate with your position and role. If your current employer is willing to pay for your classes, then you should totally take that option. Consider enrolling for online courses. Stevens-Henager College Master’s in Healthcare Administration program can be pursued online, in case you are interested!
  • Get a Master's degree. Nobody cares what you studied or what the content of your education was. They care whether you have an advanced degree, not two un-advanced degrees.
  • I do not consider that's correct
  • I have no credit card and all of these agencies that offer a free credit report are requiring you to give your credit card information. And annualcreditreport.com keeps saying there is some kind of block preventing them from giving any information at this time. It says to try again later, but I have been trying for days. If anyone can please help me i would appreciate it. Thanx .
  • If you are not able to get your report from the annual free website, call the credit reporting agencies directly. You might not be answering all the security questions correctly, or there might be a different address on your credit files if you have moved in the past year or so. Also, if you submit a dispute on your credit file, the credit reporting agencies always send you a copy of the credit file with the results. I know that Equifax has an option to receive the result copy online (www.investigate.equifax.com). The other thing that might cause a problem is if you do not have a credit history. You say you have no credit card ... have you ever had credit cards or loans in the past? If not, there simply might not be a credit record available. When in doubt, call the credit reporting agencies directly - you can request a free report if you were denied credit, or if you live in a "free" state (Maine, Massachusetts, Georgia, Vermont, Colorado, New Jersey, or Maryland), or if you are a victim of ID theft.
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