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State Georgia
Legal status 🚫
Prohibited

1750 Marietta Highway, Canton, GA 30114

Georgia

Canton

1166 Franklin Road SE No. 9, Marietta, GA 30067

Georgia

Marietta

478 North Avenue, Athens, GA 30601

Georgia

Athens

310 Maple Street, Carrollton, GA 30117

Georgia

Carrollton

6135 Roswell Road Northeast, Atlanta, GA 30328

Georgia

Atlanta

6199 Highway 92, Acworth, GA 30102

Georgia

Acworth

1544 Tara Road, Jonesboro, GA 30238

Georgia

Jonesboro

1101 E Montgomery Xrd, Savannah, GA 31406

Georgia

Savannah

2141 W Broad Street No. Centre, Athens, GA 30606

Georgia

Athens

1015 Alpharetta Street, Roswell, GA 30075

Georgia

Roswell


Frequently asked questions about easy loans in georgia

  • I want to buy a house, condo, or townhouse someplace in Georgia. I live in California but I don't want to move to Georgia. How much could I qualify for on a loan if my score is 608 if I can get one at all. Just looking for an extra way to get some money the legal way. I know my score is low but could I at-least qualify for something around 100,000?
  • Yes you can, you'll need a property manager though. Rental property isn't that easy to manage and even harder if you are out of state, for example if the tenant didn't pay rent, who would issue the eviction notice?
  • I wouldn't recommend be a long distance landlord. It is alot of work and trouble. Have you ever been a landlord? It is not as easy as you may think. Remember you will need to call someone even for the minor issues that might arise. Your profit margin will be considerable less with a property manager. You are on the right path for financial freedom. Real Estate is always the best bet. Good Luck.
  • You would have to talk to a mortgage lender in CA that can do business in Georgia, or one in Georgia. It isn't just about your credit score, but your ability to pay. A lender will look at your income, your debt to income ratio, length of time at your job, etc.. Being a landlord is not for the meek, especially if you are 3,000 miles away. A property management company will want about 15% - 20% of the rent to manage the property for you, plus the cost of repairs.
  • I agree. Plus, maintenance and repairs are more easily handled by an agent. If you can work it out, this is probably a great time. Real estate in Coastal Georgia is down about 30% right now.
  • It is absolutely possible. Research the cities, other than Atlanta, and Macon that are experiencing growth. Athens is the city where the University of Georgia is located, and I have rentals in cities that have a college in them.
  • YES! However be away long distance landlording is very tough and if you get a property mgr. you're giving up some of the profits.
  • yes you can, you become an absentee landlord
  • I'm 20 years old. I currently live in Georgia, but I would like to move to the U.K. What is a good way of finding a job and place of residence? About how long will the process take? Will I be able to have my cats there too, or do they have to stay here? Will I have any trouble going to college there? I know its a lot of questions at once, but I just want to get as much info as possible. I'm about to go google a bunch of stuff too... Thanks!
  • Easiest way to live there is to go on a student visa. (I am an american and went through this process already)... You will have to show you can afford school through savings or student loans and prove you have enough money to support yourself without asking for government aide. The cats can go, but will have to be quarentined.... It is an AMAZING place to live.... so Good Luck! Once you find a school, you have to get accepted, then you have to apply through UCAS, which you have to submit to get your visa.... then you have a 2 year visa, and can work 20 hours a week. Hope this helps.
  • Contact the UK Embassy / consulate. They can give you all the info. It's not easy. Your cats would have to go into quarantine for a long time when they reach the UK. To get a work permit it would have to be done through aUK company that employs you and they would have to show why you can do the job better than a UK citizen / resident. To get a student visa you would need an offer of a place at a recognized university.
  • It is very difficult. You have to have a formal offer of employment, family in the Uk, or otherwise have clear ties to the nation (not: "old ancestry") One route could be applying for a student visa (if you've money to study abroad for a 1yr period+) because then you can say you've lived there sufficiently to establish residence. Good luck!!! Contact the embassy, but it will not be easy, it's all bureocratic ordeals>>> I got a Turkish resident permit once (to stay longer in the nation) and it was hell getting it, and this is Turkey.
  • First stop is here: http://www.britainusa.com/visas/showcats... Yes you can bring over your cats with you but I will warn you as I have brought 2 of my husbands cats to the UK, it is VERY VERY expensive and they have to spend 6 months in quarantine. It cost over $4000 each cat to quarantine on top of that you have to pay humungus amounts for veterinary paperwork in the USA, freight company to ship them, the airfare on top of that, paperwork on arrival into the UK, quarantine handlers charge to collect them from airport. I would guestimate it cost us in excess of $12000-14000 for the two of them, then one of our cats died 6 months after leaving quarantine through kidney failure.
  • I'm graduating college this year, and I am hoping to find a good job soon. I want to move out into an apartment or house. After graduation, I am planning to stay with my family and save money for a year or so. I also will be paying off student loans. How much should I save in order to move out without struggling? Also, is it better to rent or own when you're in your early 20's? I'm a single male with no kids.
  • You need a part time job now and you need to save every dime you can. You need to start looking now for places in your area if that is where you plan to stay to see what the area and the prices are.. you need credit...maybe a parent could help add you to a card until you can get on your own...assuming they have good credit...getting a card in your name...not inflating it...will make a huge difference...to getting you started. do you have a checking or savings accounts you need them..not only to have a spot for money but for making it easy on paying rent most apartments want references and a job history and good credit...for 2 years... you need a security deposit and first and last and current rent....the later is for deposit..on apt I think you totally need to pay off all student loans before moving out..you might need 2 part time jobs..and anything works it does not have to be in you field of study... it will be worth all you effort...but you need to have all student loans gone and about $6000 at hand to settle in to a new place beyond mom and dad's.. also while you are saving watch how you consume products...shampoo deo detergent all cost something and when you are on your own you do your own laundry that means buying products to wash...detergent is not free...so start helping around the house if the parents are still providing all these things *(*
  • in USA , u do not qualify for buying or renting a house - simple. as for apartment, get work and a career that pay at least FOUR times monthly rent. ie rent 400 = 1600 monthly income. DO that for 2 full years, u will find renting easy. save up 3 -4 time the monthly rent u can afford actually. get a small 1bed/1bath in an area u do not need to 'carry'. large places will cost u short and long term. use a library to learn least u get burned.
  • moving out into an apartment or dorm? around 500 dollars(if you have a current job) so you pay for rent and you need to buy some food if you dont have a job then 1000 dollars or more if your unsure when you'll find a job of any kind(part time) just enough for you to live out for a few days till you get a job and then you can start making money from that
  • That depends on you. How much money do you spend each month? where are you moving to and how much will that cost? Are you going to pay for your own....food, gas, entertainment, tv, cell phone, etc? How long are you going to move out for before moving back? Its not how much you should save, but how much you make vs how much you spend. For example, if you have $1, and everything is free for you, you don't need to save any money. On the other hand, if you saved $10, and you are making $10 income every month, but you spend $12 every month, you're eventually going to run out of money, because, regardless of how much you've saved, if you are not earning (or replacing) as much as you're spending, its not sustainable.
  • enough for a down payment, everything you will need for that house, and 6 months worth of bills (including rent). I can't tell you a number since I have no idea where you live and how much that would be.
  • What you save to move out of your parents house would be determined by the budget you make. Your budget would determine the amount you would need for rent, utilities, transportation, entertainment, savings, insurance (Health, renters and auto), food, and clothing. No one is able to assist you in this matter as you would decide if you would want to live in a rental that cost $700.00 per month or one that cost $3,000 per month. You would be the only one able to make that decision as you know the amount you earn each month and would want to pay for rent each month. I hope this has been of some benefit to you, good luck. "FIGHT ON"
  • How much should I invest in my 401k for the first job (first year), or should I wait until 2nd year? FYI: I am; Straight out of college Annual salary is $ 46,000. Living in Georgia. I am single, no mortgage yet (living on Apartment) Only Car loan. 401K Benefits: 100-percent of first 3-percent 50-percent of next 2-percent
  • Since you are just starting out, now is the absolute easiest point in your life to sock away as much as possible into a 401(k). Being young with smaller bills, you can start to budget your contributions and it will be much easier to continue these contributions into the future. You should begin saving now as putting it off can make a huge difference in your overall savings when you near retirement. In your case, your company matches the first 3% at 100% and the next 2% at 50%. This is a valuable benefit that you should not pass up as it could arguably be considered "free money". If you do the full 5% contribution, you'll actual be contributing 9% of your income towards your retirement account because of the employer matching. Take full advantage of this. Of course, you can save more than 5% if you wish - it's a really good idea - but 5% will maximize your benefits from your employer.
  • Experts say that saving 10% of your pay over your entire working life (between your contributions and your employer's match) is not quite enough to maintain the same standard of living in retirement as while working. So, I would at minimum put in 7% and get the 4% match for a total of 11%, and never decrease it (not when you buy a house or have kids or start to pay for the kids' college). By all means put away more if you can. The longer the money is invested, the more it returns.
  • Bare minimum of 5% to get the full available matching contributions, since that's essentially FREE money! Beyond that, bare in mind that the longer your money grows "tax free", the more compound income you will earn (interest on your interest earnings), so the contributions you make NOW will provide MOST of the money you eventually end up with.... For 2016, the maximum you can contribute under IRS rules is $18,000 Wouldn't you have taken this job if it only paid $34,000, if that all but GUARANTEED you'd retire a multi-millionaire? You should contribute $18,000 if your plan will let you, even if you only do so for three years....That $54,000 deferred for thirty years and invested 100% in Common stocks will grow to somewhere between $310,149 (at 8% average growth) and $716,455 (at 12% average growth), even if you never make another penny in contributions! Defer 10% of every check, and invest it in the most Aggressive fund available in your plan, and continue doing that until you are 60, and you'll have close to $2M
  • First off, as long as you can afford it, ALWAYS max out what the company pays. Second, ALWAYS put as much as you can afford into it. Personally I max out my Roth IRA as well. At least 75% of the time, when I get raises I just increase my contribution (you don't really notice if you've gotten used to living on your current salary). I've been doing this since I was about 22, I'm 47 now and contribute 19% of my salary. I am set to retire comfortably at age 62. Note, given the current law you can withdraw money out of your Roth IRA for a first time home. Good luck.
  • start out with at least 6% of your own pay, and put all of it into ROTH, no you won't get the tax breaks now but you are making low money and are in a lower tax bracket than you will be in later. so pay the 15% tax and in 40 years all that money will have grown and every penny you withdraw after 59.5 is tax free. Also set up your contributions to increase by 1% each Jan or when you get annual raises, max it out.
  • put at least 5% in so you get that maximum company matching - if you can afford more, bump it up a couple of % and increase it by 1% each year
  • Take advantage of the entire employer matched amount so 5% or more if you can afford to.
  • As much as you can comfortably afford. Increase it yearly as you get raises up to the max allowable.
  • 5%
  • Five percent. Get the full match.
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