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State California
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Allowed (Our partner lenders provide payments in California)
Loan amount limit  $255 if maximum fee charged ($300 maximum check)
Loan terms Max: 31 days
Finance rates 15% of check
Finance charges $17.65
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11623 Cherry Avenue No. B4, Fontana, CA 92337

California

Fontana

1295 North Euclid Street, Fullerton, CA 92835

California

Fullerton

82227 Us Highway 111, Indio, CA 92201

California

Indio

1450 Olive Drive No. A, Bakersfield, CA 93308

California

Bakersfield

1460 7th Street No. A, Oakland, CA 94607

California

Oakland

1955 41st Avenue No. B8, Capitola, CA 95010

California

Capitola

3276 Adeline Street, Berkeley, CA 94703

California

Berkeley

100 North Raymond Avenue, Fullerton, CA 92831

California

Fullerton

134 W Base Line Road, Rialto, CA 92376

California

Rialto

836 N Santa Fe Avenue No. A, Vista, CA 92083

California

Vista


Frequently asked questions about best personal loans california

  • Best thing to do is to consult a professional who knows California law.
  • If you are not the personal gaurantor it won't hurt you.
  • are you incorporated?? If not then you are personally responsible for your companys debts.
  • Probably not. In order to sue in court in Texas, the Texas court must have jursdiction over the person, and personal jurisdiction (two different things). But, the most important thing is that the defendant must have sufficient contacts with the state for the court to exercise its jurisdiction. Here, the person lives in Cal, does not live in Texas, did not enter the contract in Texas, and therefore there is likely insufficient contacts with the state to confer jurisdiction. Sorry this is not the answer you want, but you should also be aware that a judgment is simply a legal decree that he owes you money. It is likely that you would still need to collect, an entirely different kettle of fish. California is your best bet.
  • No, you must sue in California.
  • I need honest, professional and spiritual answers! I have lived in Southern California for several years. My profession as an interior designer. My last job working for a company paid me very little, and I was mainly just their office house wife. Eventually my car was repocessed and I had to file for Bankruptcy. I lived in an isolated area in S. Cal. It was hard to get around and had to rely on my bike. I lost touch with friends, and didn't do much of anything.... just work every day for 8 hours sitting at a desk, and then biking home. Day in and day out it was the same routine with no extra money to do much. For a few month, my now ex lived with me. Eventually he moved up in status with his art and such, as I just stayed in the same old dumn routine, trying to find a way out. He kept telling me to do something different with my life. He mentioned things like taking a course to teach English as a foreign language, and that he would help me pay for it, etc. Soon after he moved out he left the country to travel through Europe and Asia for 6 months. After he left I though more and more about taking a TEFL course... I was anxious to make some drastic changes. I decided to spend all of my extra money on taking a TEFL course in Thailand. I bought the ticket, tried my best to tie up loose ends, quit my job and flew out to Thailand..... Here I am now: in Bangkok, with no money, A TEFL certificate in hand, and confused. I spent some time traveling through Thailand and met some amazing people (this is the first time I've ever traveled in my life). My life is more exciting, but much less stable. I've delved into spiritual books like, The Art of Happiness, Gems, Kara books, etc. trying to find the better, stronger ME. I don't know if I need to PUSH as hard as I can to make this all work out by teaching English here in Thailand, or if I should find a way back to S. Cal and get my old job back, or maybe another job. Keeping in mind I have no car. I'm torn. Here's somethings that are weighing me down..... I owe three people money. A close friend, My aunt, and my exboyfrind's mother. In that exact order. I have no savings, no security, and have a few bills that need immediate attention. I've been turned onto doing some freelance writing, and although that seemed promising, I keep running into issues that prevent me from moving forward to make any money from it yet. At the moment, I'm borrowing a labtop, staying in someone elses place while they are in Germany for a brief moment, and trying to save face by telling everyone I'm good and happy. So, I'm in Thialand. I've been here almost a month. Would love more than anything to travel more in my life, as I have met people from all over the world, makes me want to see so much more of the world. I don't know If I could live here. In my current situation should I try to make this work for at least 6 months, or do I need to throw in the towel, go back to Cali, pay off my personal loans and look at this as all a great experience?
  • What do you think you will feel like when you get back to Cali? Would you regret returning to Cali? Cali will always be there. If you're not feeling Thailand, then there are other places/countries where you could teach nearby and make more money. Although you sound broke. It's hard to say I have been there before. I would advise to do the thing that you're scared of doing. Going back to the same job sounds lame.
  • Stay. I like you to stay, CareBears have a very nice azzes. don't know if I'm a perv or not. but I like CareBear butts. but you are also a good questioner and answerer, funny and have cute avatar. although you may turn out to be a man in the basement. or a woman in an office cubicle. Edit: "The an" is a proper grammar, but I wronged it.
  • What does your gut tell you should do?
  • MIght try contacting tttompatz on eslcafe.com unstablity is good, for a bit, but sooner or later you're going to have to wake up and smell the coffee, pay off your debt, and save for retirement. How old are you? that has a lot to do with it.
  • A "housewife" is an honorable endeavor, and it needs to be brought back into today's world. I did not continue reading past this.
  • I need 3-4 different African American women's diary, journals (personal accounts) during thee Gold Rush. I have found them extremely hard to come by (There are just male accounts), but I really want to do my Paper on African American women during the Gold Rush. Do you know where I can find any or even just naming a black women from that time would help. Your help is greatly appreciated and thank you in advance.
  • Mary Anne Pleasant (1814-1904) arrived in California in 1850 with a price on her head, thanks to her work with the underground railroad, and several thousand dollars she had inherited from her deceased husband. She opened her own boardinghouse in San Francisco, which was very elegant and attracted some of the top-drawer businessmen and politicians. She went on to invest in real estate, give loans, and advice in financial affairs. "She handled more money during pioneer days in California" wrote one historian "than any other colored person." Legend has it that Pleasant contributed $30,000 to fund John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry in 1859. In 1864, she sued two San Francisco streetcar companies for refusing her the right to board. She seems to have acquired a reputation for partcising voodoo. One divorce trial in 1881 centred around the question of whether she had sold occult love potions to the wife. Clara Brown, a freed slave, got aplace on a wagon train to Pike's Peak by promising to do the cooking and washing for the wood-be prospectors. In Cherry Creek, the future city of Denver, she made a good deal of money running a laundry and became a well-loved citizen who, in the word of a local paper, turned her house into 'a hospital, a hotel, and a general refuge for those who were sick and in poverty.' At the end of the Civil War, she took her savings and tried to find her husband and four children, who had been sold off to different owners before she was freed. Unsuccessful, she returned to Colorado with twenty-six former slaves, some of them orphaned, and helped them find homes and jobs. Her search for her family, her charity, and the duplicity of white businessmen, drained her money. But thankfully this story has a happy ending. In 1882, past eighty years old and impoverished, she received word from an old friend who had stumbled across Brown's daughter, Eliza Jane, a widow living in Iowa. with money donated by neighbors, Brown went by train to meet her daughter in Council Bluffs. clara brought her granddaughter Cindy back to Denver, where they continued her work and charitable efforts. When she died in 1885, the mayor and governor of Colorado were among the mourners and the minister eulogized "one of the most unselfish lives on record."
  • How Gold Prospectors Lived During the Gold Rush http://goldeprise.blogspot.com/2013/10/GoldProspectors_16.html
  • I want to go to a California State University (CSU) for my undergrad major in Civil Engineering and then go to possibly UC Berkeley, UC Santa Barbara, Stanford, Cal Tech for grad school in Civil Engineering. Would going to a Cal State matter much when I apply to these grad schools? I got accepted to UCLA as an undergrad, but due to personal issues with money, it will be much easier (and beneficial) if I go to a Cal State and try to save some money for grad school. I know I will succeed at a Cal State, I'm just concerned that the grad schools I apply to will see a Cal State as a sign of not being competitive.
  • You can make a school what you want it to be. Sure, it may not have the same prestige of another U of C campus, but if you get outstanding grades, perhaps enter an honors program, study abroad, do internships, etc., you will just as good of a candidate for the same Masters program as someone who went to UCLA. I was in the same predicament. I wanted to go to a private college in MN that was almost $50,000 per year. After I realized how much I would have to take out in loans, I decided to confirm my enrollment at the University of Minnesota Morris. It doesn't have the same kinds of prestigious programs the U of M Twin Cities (the main campus) has, but it has the name of the U of MN, therefore it will carry me throughout the U.S and people recognize the U of M system. I also want to study Spanish and Intn'l Relations, and I might have less opportunities to study abroad if I were to go to a private college that costs almost triple that of the U of M Morris. Therefore, college is what you make of it. Many colleges still have professors that have their PhD's or have done impressive research. You just have to find what program you like best, and consider what schools fits best for you in terms of academics, AND affordability.
  • Your undergraduate institution will always be considered. If you applied from UCLA to the schools you want to you would have a much better shot. Your school would be considered more rigorous and holds a better academic reputation. It also would give you many more internship and research opportunities which will help you get into graduate school. UCLA also has a much more respected faculty. Imagine getting a recommendation letter from Terence Tao. Who wouldn't want you then? A Master's degree is only two years as well. The money you'd make after would help you with any financial shortcomings. I would seriously re-consider. In your position I would choose UCLA.
  • if i were u id go to UCLA dont worry bout the money other kids will have the same financial problems but as long as u talk to ur councelors they WILL hellp u out :) pls answer mine http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;...
  • Please read all of this, it would help so much and thorough, long answers are most certainly appreciated. I've been involved with horses most of my life but started learning properly a fair few years ago. Ever since I loaned a Standardbred, but it wasn't much. I rarely rode him and was only loaning for a few months until he was sold. I never felt a bond either and he wasn't my type of horse. Four months ago I finally found (after a 6 month search) a horse to share. He was very spooky, walked all over me and didn't want me to catch him in the fields. After a few sessions of join up I finally noticed the bond. He followed me everywhere, I taught him tricks and how to lunge. He rarely spooks with me and never plays up anymore. He is mine for 3 days a week, I pay his board and feed and 2 other people share him for 2 days each. The owner can't ride. I have been interested in buying him but I highly doubt it will ever happen. I offered the owner but she said she doesn't think she will ever sell him. Plus with the other sharers I don't think so either. Recently I've been really annoyed and reported a few times by new boarders for somethings I haven't done and I feel that the owner doesn't trust me as much anymore. I love her to bits, she is so nice but if I was in her position I would be a bit unsure too, from these reports (not that I abused him or anything). The girl who reported me apologized and begged (literally) for forgiveness because I was so annoyed when I went there so I did, but I heard today she rode him and I felt so jealous/protective which I've never felt before. Anyway back to the point. I want a horse of my own, as a project, to break in. I know what I'm doing. I have helped friends and researched for months (please don't try to talk me out of this, I'm not here for that). I would love the experience and I can afford it. But I can't afford my share and a horse of my own. My share doesn't jump, which I love doing. But we have a bond and I will miss him if I ever give him up... I'm really stuck. I've been talked into just keeping him until next summer but it gets to me everyday and I don't know what to do? Your advice and personal views would really help. If you've been in this situation please help!
  • Add: But the main thing I am concerned about is letting his owner down. The aim of sharing him was to help her through the rough months of winter and if I give him up before then I would feel awful, like I used him just for summer. I did explain it to her and she said she completely understands and it's fine if I want my own, she would just have to find another person. P.S I might delete this question for private purposes, I've made it a bit blatent with the story and I don't quite want it being found by anyone I know LOL.
  • I haven't been in this exact position before, but I was in one where I had to give up my lovely Arabian. I got him for my birthday when he was 5 months old and I trained him and took care of him, but then I moved to Southern California and couldn't keep him. It sucks having to give up a pet, but there are always more, not the same, but amazing in their own way. If you want to raise and train your own horse I suggest you budget yourself and buy a foal. It would be a few years before you could ride it, but you wouldn't have to deal with anyone telling lies for no reason. Being able to train my own horse was amazing, and the bond we had was unbreakable. He did whatever I told him to and even a couple years later he still remembered me and my car. I think it's a good learning experience in more ways than one. And research is nothing like the real thing, but theres always help. Anyone who works with horses have their own opinion on how to train and treat them. Some have good advice, some not so much. Vets are usually the best. But I think if you really want to do it and you have the means to, go for it! Its a great experience.
  • Okay well you have made a bond with this horse because of the tricks and you have taught it, and you know it is a nice horse. I have loved three horses (mainly because i grew out of them and had to move on) you now have to move on your need new experiences. you said that the women said it was fine and i think you should go for it, you are making your own excuses not to get one. Get a young horse to build into a brilliant horse and create a new bond!
  • I am thinking of becoming an Immigration atty. but I really don't know where to start...... I know I have to go to college first but what classes should I take, like criminal Justice, immigration especialist?? how long will it take for me to become an attorney?? how difficult are the classes?? how expensive & can i apply for a loan?? Your answers will really help me a lot! Thanks in advanced!!!! By the way I live in Texas =)
  • Immigration law is a specialty practice of law, just like contracts law, personal injury law or constitutional law - if you want to be come an immigration attorney, you would get an undergraduate degree, then apply to a law school. The law schools in Texas, Arizona, Florida, and California are places (for obvious reasons) where "immigration law" tracks are popular and readily available. Your choice of an undergraduate degree isn't as important as some people might tell you. It is NOT necessary to major in anything called "pre-law". What is more important is that you earn very good grades, as the better law schools are all highly selective when it comes to admissions. Sure, Yale accepts only 7.3% of its law school applicants, but even the University of Wyoming accepts only slightly more than 1/4 of the students who apply for admission. You will want to focus on a major that gives you exposure to a broad range of disciplines - law schools like to see applicants with psychology, philosophy, government and business courses on their transcripts. Don't discount courses like mathematics, which you might not see as relevant - trust me, lawyers spend a lot of time working with numbers, and if you ever hope to manage your own practice, you'll need both business and math expertise. Law schools also like to see themselves as training empathic people who want to serve and improve their communities - this means you should take advantage of opportunities to involve yourself in social programs, whether it's mentoring disadvantaged students, working with the hungry and homeless, job training, senior citizens, whatever. You should do these things throughout your college years, not just in high school. Law school is usually a 3-year program, so you're looking at 4 years for an undergraduate, plus another 3 for the JD (juris doctorate). You'll need to take the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) near the end of your junior year as an undergrad, so that you'll have your scores in hand when you apply to law school as a senior. It's also worth noting that many (but certainly not all) law school applicants take time off between their undergraduate degree and their law school application - some law schools place a premium on work experience, especially if it's at all related to the study or application of the law. Law school is an intense graduate program, which will challenge you to think about things in a whole new way. Many schools use a somewhat unique training approach called "the Socratic method", where the emphasis is on self-discovery gained while pondering "deep" questions, rather than taking notes as your professors lecture. Some people love it, some people hate it, some universities find it old-fashioned and don't bother with it. You'll do best in law school if you like to think more than follow instructions. Law school, like every other professional graduate program (medicine, dentistry, etc) is an expensive endeavor. There are plenty of loans available, but most law school students leave law school burdened with heavy debt. The most recent figures put the average debt around $54,000 for state university schools and $83,000 for private law schools. Unfortunately, these debt loads turn many students away from some of the lower-paying community service-type law practices. I hope this helped you - good luck!
  • Find unique, reliable and quality Houston Business Immigration Attorneys Services at the ZAIDI LAW FIRM, P C Contact an immigration Lawyer to help you with your immigration needs and problems
  • If you are in this country legally you don't need to. Marrying an American citizen is a free pass. Save your money and contact your local Congressional Representative. He or she has people who will help you. If you are illegal, hire the attorney. Don't waste any time though. As of June 2007, the cost for a green card application will be raised to $900.
  • Will South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia, need the Economic Stimulus to revive spending? Cash Crop farming tends to operate with a sense of production rather than speculative value. Are these states subject to a standard that needs less "Bailout" than states with limited "Cash Crop" sense of value? Do these states spend wisely based upon production value rather than speculate on the dubious resources of fictitious "Wall Street Assets"?
  • Depends on your definition of "need". Has the economic downturn hit the Carolinas and Virginia? Definitely. Real estate values are down all across the country, including these three states: http://www.realtor.org/wps/wcm/connect/7...That means lower revenues from property taxes for local governments. House sales are also down, which means reduced purchases of appliances, furniture, etc. Then there is the crash in the financial sector which has made it harder for everyone to get loans for anything, whether it is fixing up local schools, investing in new factories, or making significant personal purchases (cars, housing, etc.) The automobile industry is down all over including these states. Every state has car dealerships, auto insurance brokers, etc. that are affected by the sharp decrease in purchases. But these states also have car assembly plants and car part plants. Note that whether it is the cash crops in these states, the film industry in California, the car industry in Detroit, etc. there is no state where the state "exports" directly involve more than a relatively small number of people. Most people are part of the local economy: supermarkets, gas stations, the school system, insurance brokers, etc. When people start spending less, it is this bulk of the economy that is affected, even if the primary export sector is not. In the case of the current crisis, the precipitating factor may have been the housing bubble, and the ongoing problem may well be the credit crunch, but the 800 pound gorilla in the room is the fact that Americans were going heavily into debt to live the good life - they were spending more than they earned; running up large credit card bills, etc. in the process. Even if housing prices had not dropped and the financial sector had not had a melt-down, the economy would be in trouble just because people couldn't keep going into debt indefinitely. The hope is that the economy will recover enough that more people will have jobs, that people will have more income to spend, etc. Hoping that the economy will be stimulated to the point where people go back to spending more than their incomes is asking for major trouble - especially if you get what you wish for. As for the spending in these states, these states are all well below average in infrastructure investment by any measure, including education expenditures per student. http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2006/expenditures...Can any society that skimps on basic education be doing a good job?
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