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City Louisville
State Kentucky
Legal status
Allowed (Our partner lenders provide payments in Louisville)
Loan amount limit $500
Loan terms 14-60 days
Finance rates $15 per $100 on face value of check + $1 database fee
Finance charges $17.65
Maximum APR (Annual percentage rate) 459%

Frequently asked questions about loans in louisville ky

  • I am looking at a job offer in DC that pays an annual salary of 35K. I have heard from some people that this is more than enough to survive (in a humble, maybe even modest, way). But all the cost-of-living comparison charts I've seen say that I'd need to make 42K in DC to compare to my current 29K in Louisville, KY. My committed expenses (loans, insurance, etc.) are around $800-900 per month, not including food, commuting expenses, or rent. I pay $525 for rent now, but I've seen estimates as high as $1700 average in DC?! Anyone familiar with DC enough to gage whether or not I could make it?? I live alone now and would prefer to do so in DC, but I might need a roommate to split rent?? Any thoughts are much appreciated!!! :o)
  • It's possible to make it on 35k in DC, plenty of people do. You just may not be able to afford living in the city. You could probably afford to live on your own in some of the suburbs, but that still doesn't change the cost of living (food and commodity prices are typically higher in the area), plus you'll also have higher taxes than you would in Kentucky. So bottom line is yes, you would be able to make it, but you may be less comfortable than you are in Louisville.
  • I cannot make that judgment for you but I used to live in DC and here's my take: - Rent for a studio apt in DC is at least $1400+utils. In neighboring VA and MD it is $1100+utils but you'll have to subway into work at $8-12 per day - DC income tax is 9% - State sales tax for food etc. purchases is 8+% -Utilities elec $80, water/sewage $20 So $35k minus federal taxes est. $5500 minus state tax $3000 minus SS/medicare tax $4000 minus $2000 medical/dental insurance premiums minus loan payments $900 x 12 months equals = approx. $9,500 in remaining income for the whole year ($~790 per month) for food, gas, fare, utilities, eating out, clothes, dry cleaning, trips, emergencies etc. Not even space to sock away retirement money. Most singles save money in rent by half or so by sharing an apt or house. Still it would be almost a hand to mouth existence requiring a lot of discipline. The biggest challenge in DC or other coastal US cities like NY or LA is that, unlike in simple Kentucky, you are surrounded by a lot (25% of households+) of well-off people (earning $150,000+ yearly) living in big houses, driving fancy cars, well dressed, who eat out and take big vacations a lot--and it may be hard to resist the temptation to follow suit and end up in a deep financial gutter. Good luck.
  • My Toyota battery lasted from 2009 until last year (over 75,000 miles) when I had it replaced. It depends on the type battery you get, whether it is good or not. I have some men who work on mine put one in for me, and they told me the brand it was, but I forgot. I would never get one from a dealer because they rip you off.
  • Based on the information you provided your loan would be $265,375. This does not include closing costs, some of which need to be paid out of pocket. (If you are taking a FHA loan, then the Upfront Mortgage Insurance premium can be rolled into the loan). Your monthly payment would be about $1,855 and include the following: Principal and Interest: $1,191.65 FHA Mortgage Insurance Premium (monthly): $276 (currently 1.25%) Property Tax: approximately $295 (about $3541 annually for a property assessed at $275,000). Property Insurance: About $92 per month. (about 0.4% p.a.) I recommend that you shop around for your mortgage. Don't rely just on the interest rate, but look at the mortgage rate and mortgage fees. Also shop around for third party fees such as property insurance. For information about property taxes in Louisville, Ky. use this site: http://www.jcsoky.org. The right type of loan for you will depend on your credit score and your debt-to-income ratio (DTI). You will need a monthly income of at least $5,983 to qualify for a FHA loan, based on the monthly housing expenses listed above (a 31% Front-end DTI). The Back-end DTI limit is 43% for a FHA loan and your total necessary income depends on your monthly debt payments. I recommend that you shop around. Check out Bills.com mortgage rates at http://www.bills.com/mortgatge-rates and then get an offer.
  • go to bankrate.com. you can calculate any mortgage but 275k -8,250down would this be 30yrs or 15 and you have closing cost too (if paid out of pocket donot affect mortgage) local city,county goverments have web sites that tell millage rates or calulate taxes
  • Google mortgage calculators. You will also need to include PMI since you are not putting down 20%...and don't forget about your closing costs.
  • Principal and interest will be about $1,190. Can't help you with taxes or homeowners insurance - and don't forget to add in mortgage insurance also.
  • I'm looking at buying a home in louisville, ky. I have 0 down but am eligible for a VA loan. I have a 646 credit rating and rising. I'm looking at about 200,000 multi family home. I make about 60000 a year. Two things. First, what is my max eligibility. Second what would total payment be on that. I tried looking up the tax rates there but was thoroughly confused. I'm also guessing that PMI wont be neccessary if its a VA loan.
  • Go to your bank or credit union and ask for a prequalification. You are wrong about PMI. And, there is a $2000 VA funding fee. However, the seller has to pay many of the closing costs. Big Problem: You said Multi Unit. VA loans do NOT permit investment property. Sorry. :(
  • Talk to a real estate broker
  • I live in Louisville, KY and the nearest Air Force base is several hours away. I know that many Navy and Army Reservists drill in Louisville even though there is not a base located there. Would the Air Force Reserve do the same for people that live in this area? I'm pretty interested in public affairs, but it seems like the other branches do not have many openings for these jobs. For whatever reason, might it be easier to pursue this in the air force? On that note, does this job qualify for a Loan Repayment program in the AF Reserves? Thanks!
  • yes, it does.
  • I'm turning almost 20 years old. I'm at a phase where I really don't know what to do with my life as of now, I want to work and go to college but I'm not making close enough to be able to sustain myself in school its soooo freakin expensive and I really don't want to get stuck with debts if I ask for a loan. I was considering maybe going to the army or marines not sure which but joining either of too was going to be my last resort but I really don't know. Would joining help my education? Is there risks in joining? Any what ifs? Looking back as to my older sister she's has gone to college but she is paying so much cause of her laon pretty much that's all she works for and she hadn't found a good job yet cause of the economy is bad, that leaves me thinking about really joining the army/marines.. I know there so much people who have been in this situation and have solved it so I need to do the same,, beginning with brain storming ?/
  • Since you don't really know if you would like the army or marines, go in the National Guard or reserves. The National Guard commits you to one weekend a month (you can google it and find out more) and also it pays for your education. The risks of joining any military branch is war. You never know when you might get called up, and if you do the enlisted ppl are called first. First of all, check with different colleges for grants-they do not have to be paid back. Be sure and check and see if you are eligible for financial aid and try to avoid any loans. Here, in Louisville, KY UPS (United Parcel Service) pays for your education and apartment if you work for them at least 20 hours. Other companies probably do the same. I would join the military as a last resort...Good luck and God bless. things have a way of working out when you least expect them to.
  • In both situations (army vs. loan), it's going to require some kind of risk assessment and sacrifice. I personally would consider getting the loan because I don't want to learn the art of war. Not to mention, entering the army is a commitment I'd make with my body, and if needed I'd be called upon to fight and die for a cause that I may or may not fully buy into. The army is about conformity and hierarchy, and a part of me would always be questioning it. But then again, I can see the appeal of joining the army; it's a great trade off. Do some time--relatively low risk for the majority--and get a free college education. Seems simple, and it works out for a lot of folks. I think ultimately it's just a personal decision you make. Pros and cons in both situations. So do your risk assessment and think deeply about what you're willing to sacrifice. Good luck!
  • consider instead a trade school. there's nothing wrong with it. You learn only what you need to learn to help you make a good living. You don't have to study Elizabethean poetry, you don't have to read Finnegan's Wake. I mean, you CAN if you want to...but you can do that on your own time, in the house you bought with the money you earned from the job you acquired because of a two year stint in a trade school. Even a six month stint. You can go to driving school and learn how to drive an 18 wheeler, make $3000-$4000 a month just driving back and forth across America. Some of those trucks practically have APARTMENTS in them. And you can always get a free shower at a community college or some hospital along the way. No one checks for student IDs when you're using the showers in the gym. And hospitals, who's going to ask who you're visiting? Those people all have jobs. And it AIN'T checking visitor's IDs.
  • In all seriousness, i would join the army. Join up for 3 years, and take a break from civillian life. Once you get out you will have more confidence to go to school and theres a thing called the gi bill that pays for college when you get out.
  • The military is a good way to go about preparing for college, especially financially. Plus the military offers a great life experience most don't get to have. I say go for it if you really want to go to college and cost is the main issue. They really set you up for school you basically just go to class. It seems like it worth it to basically go to college for free. If you are a driven person you will have no problems in the end.
  • If you look at it from philosophical angle, these are individual problems, which has to be sorted out through self-effort or with the help of a mentor of their own choice. In general, these problems arise because of two reasons. One is lack of physical self-discipline and the second cause is lack of mental control. We have to exercise lot of patience. These are common problems. We should try to take examples from those who have achieved great successes in spite of having several problems in their family life.
  • the military is an option yes but so are the peacecorp or americorps. though them you can get an education and job experience which is always helpful. i recommend you looking at all your options such as he peacecorps and such. they might be a better fit for you if you are wary of joining the military as while it is a good thing it is not for everyone. if you get all your info together it is easier to make you choices once you have looked into every option. good luck
  • G The Air Force is a better option. More technology, less scattered intestines.
  • I just received my tax refund...It was $538 LESS THAN the determined amount!!! River City Bank-(Louisville KY.) withheld that amount from a R.A.L. from 1997 in which then a tax service prepared my return & the R.A.L. was approved for the amount...Apparently something happened somewhere,and they withheld $538 from my 2009 return !!! IS THIS LEGAL ??? I've checked on various statue of limatations, which state only 6 yrs...And no !! I dont have any outstanding back taxes !!! Any advice on help ????
  • The RAL banks can collect for ANY OTHER RAL bank for ANY YEAR's UNPAID RAL. You're lucky they didn't take added interest and penalty. It was a LOAN. You promised to pay it back. You didn't, so they helped themselves. For the good news...as long as this loan is paid back, you won't have to worry about it again.
  • Labor: Union loss in vote proves secret ballot bad George Orwell had nothing on Big Labor, and apparently, the New York Times. The paper gives a credulous reading to the union’s position that two failed elections in a Louisville hospital to organize nurses shows the need for Card Check and the elimination of the secret ballot. Instead, the outcome shows how easily card-check systems can get manipulated to overwhelm the will of the majority: The battle has ground on for 20 years. In 1989 and again in 1994, a clear majority of nurses at a Louisville, Ky., hospital signed cards saying they wanted a union. But each time a majority of the nurses later voted down the idea when it was put to a secret ballot. Organized labor points to the fight at Norton Audubon Hospital as proof that America’s labor laws need to be overhauled: judges ruled that management had prevailed by illegally intimidating and firing nurses. Nurses who want a union plan to try again, and they had expected a Democratic president and Congress to retool labor laws to make it easier to win. Instead, in Louisville and around the country, organized labor may be facing a major setback in the most contentious fight over labor laws since the 1940s. In this fight, the NLRB found many violations of law by management regarding their efforts to persuade the nurses not to unionize. Seven years ago, a judge ordered the union recognized as a penalty against management, even though the union lost in a secret ballot 366 to 220, an overwhelming majority. An appellate court upheld other penalties against the hospital, but overturned the recognition — which means the union has to hold another organizing effort. Now, if management treated people that badly, then one might expect the nurses to overwhelmingly support a union for their own protection. A secret ballot would give them the best opportunity to implement that, clearly and honestly. So far, the nurses have not opted to do that, which speaks louder than the court about where the nurses see their best interests. What lesson are we to take from this story? Is it that management intimidated the nurses so badly that they somehow forced the nurses to vote against unionization in secret, even though they had publicly signed cards supporting the organizing effort? Does that make any sense at all? The obvious explanation is that the act of getting signed cards does not accurately reflect the wishes of the workers, and that any intimidation that occurred would have impacted the card-check process — where people are public about their positions — rather than in the secret ballot that followed. Recall this previous post: Video: Another cautionary Card Check tale. In that case, the employer colluded with the union to use Card Check instead of a secret ballot in order to get a loan, and it took a secret ballot initiated by the employees to chase the union out of the workplace. The secret ballot is the antidote to intimidation by both sides and should be protected as a key part of the process in organizing workplaces.
  • A secret ballot is never bad.
  • But also the powerful labor unions and the union members have to rethink thing now too. Perhaps the nurses decided that the union fees and other requirements of the unions was not in their best interest. Perhaps when it got right down to it, they figured the ones who had been outed by management did get fired and they could not afford to be fired (although without nurses, where is any hospital?). There is also a psychological thing that goes on--I know that for most of my adult life the secretaires in all the law firms I've worked in have been asked and urged to unionize to protect themselves but every time the secretaries refuse because of an immense "I'm too dedicated to my attorneys to ever walk out on them if we have to strike" attitude. These secretaries do get shafted on several aspects of their jobs but they feel too intimate with their loyalty to even consider unionizing. Plus, the monthly union fees would take a significant chunk out of their paychecks. The big auto companies are finally realizing they have to reorganize themselves somehow if they want to continue to remain in business--and the union refuses to budget to try to help lower operating costs (and union members in the auto industry are well paid). Granted, management and the executives are a huge part of the problem but so are the unions. The unions won't accept any cutbacks, won't accept any layoffs, so there's this huge labor force that thinks it can just continue grinding along as it always has been but there isn't enough money to keep them all employed and since the union members can't be fired or laid off, their income can't be reduced even slightly, and other measures most non-auto companies have been taking (furloughs and no raises and other things) can't be done in the auto industry to the whole company may have to go bankrupt. Is that smart? I know the mass transit system we have out here is heavily unionized and we have had nothing but problems--drivers can't be fired unless they do something illegal (like run someone down) so the drivers are lazy and trains and buses aren't on time, some of the drivers just park the bus somewhere and sleep then just turn in the bus because thier shift is over, not even doing their usual route. And these drivers can't be fired, they get paid whether they do their job or not and there are a lot of people who will take advantage of that. And our transit system is going down the drain fast and fares are continually raise to the point where no one can afford to use it (and some of us are greatly into saving the environment but if we can't afford public transit....). Yeh, back when the employers were basically slavers, the unions were a necessity. And I"m all for unions but the unions need to reassess things, make changes. Life in the US is not what it used to be back in The Jungle days. Things were coming to this anyway with or without Obama in office so you cannot blame him.
  • America and our Democracy is what the SECRET BALLOT IS ALL ABOUT. WITHOUT a secret ballot, we have neither. We fight wars all across the globe to instill Democracy and the right to a secret ballot. And here in our own Country, the Politicians paid off the big unions by voting for this bullshit and the taking away of the secret ballot. WHAT IS VERY VERY WRONG WITH THIS PICTURE!!!!
  • Yet another con who is against unions because their owners and republicans say they are bad lol While some union bosses have gone over board in the past....and members need to reign them in Unions are the ones who got the workers in this country where they are today and unions need to get back to working for the members as before and most do Strange it is always in certain states they hate unions...shows who the workers have listened all these years and why Remember Norma ........(:
  • In every Presidential election, there are always one or two people who were really fit out for President, but no one has ever heard of them. It's more of a populatrity contest really, so Barry Os gotta go, is absolutly right.
  • Big labor, along with 10's of millions of Americans, are regretting supporting Obama.

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